Meditative Psychoanalysis —
The Marriage of Mindfulness, Meaning, and Intimacy: The Art of Flourishing

1st Trimester of Year 2 of the Two-Year and the Full Training in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis
(can be also taken as an individual post-graduate certificate course; no pre-requisites)

Instructor: Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD
Date: Thursdays, October 13, 2022 – December 22, 2022 (8:40pm – 9:55pm)
(no class on November 24, 2022)

Location: Virtual Live
Post-graduate psychoanalytic education credits offered: 12.5 hours
Continuing Education Information: 14.5 CE See details here
Tuition: $450/10-week course/trimester (can be paid in 2 installments)
Registration fee: $25/course (waived for ORI’s candidates in training)

To Register for this training, please complete the Registration form

DESCRIPTION:

Interest in blending Eastern meditative and Western psychotherapeutic traditions is burgeoning, yet we have only begun to realize what these rich traditions can teach each other. In this course — a combination of lecture, meditation practice, and dialogue with the students — Dr. Rubin will explore what he calls meditative psychoanalysis, which blends the best aspects of Western psychoanalysis and Eastern meditative traditions into a more encompassing synthesis.
In meditative analysis, we first use meditation and yogic breathing to quiet and focus the mind, and we then explore and translate the meaning of what we have discovered using psychoanalytic understandings of symbolic and unconscious communication. Psychoanalytic attention to unconscious communication and meaning — the second facet of meditative psychoanalysis — expands the focus and equanimity that meditation fosters. The third and final aspect of meditative psychoanalysis is a special relationship (and environment) designed to illuminate and transform one’s history.
Psychoanalysis not only elucidates the interpersonal roots of adult afflictions, it offers a relationship and experience that is a vehicle for transformation in the present. In tandem with meditation, the therapeutic relationship — seen in a freer and more empathic light as the vehicle for both validating a person’s experience and providing opportunities for new forms of relatedness and self-transformation — becomes a crucible in which old patterns of restrictively seeing and organizing one’s life can be witnessed and ultimately transformed, so that new and liberating kinds of human connections can occur.

CLASS STRUCTURE:

Each class will consist of a focused presentation by the instructor, discussion of the concepts and readings, Q & A and group dialogue, and meditative and somatic practices ranging from Buddhist meditation and yogic breathing to qigong and practices derived from Chinese internal martials and Russian “Systema,” a holistic system of self-transformation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the end of this course, its participants will be able to:

  • Delineate how meditation can enrich psychoanalytic listening.
  • Discuss main concepts of meditative psychoanalysis: combining meditation and yogic breathing with exploration of the meaning of what one discovers using psychoanalytic understandings of symbolic and unconscious communication.
  • Discuss main concepts of meditative psychoanalysis: psychoanalytic attention to unconscious communication and meaning.
  • Discuss main concepts of meditative psychoanalysis: a special relationship (and environment) designed to illuminate and transform one’s history.
  • Describe and discuss what meditation neglects and omits.
  • Articulate how psychoanalytic understandings of unconscious meaning and communication can enrich the meditative process.
  • Explain how meditation and psychoanalysis can enrich each other.
  • Analyze and discuss how meditation and psychoanalysis could be integrated in one’s clinical practice and life.
  • Discuss how one’s psychoanalytic practice can be enriched by combining psychoanalytic method with meditative practice.
  • Apply the knowledge from this course to deepening one’s meditation practice.

SYLLABUS:

Class 1 and 2:

Psychoanalytic and Classical and Contemporary Buddhist Practices of Listening

  • Freud, S. “Recommendation to Physicians on Practicing Psychoanalysis.” Standard Edition, pp. 111–120.
  • Horney, K. “The Quality of the Analyst’s Attention.” In: Final Lectures, pp. 15–32.
  • Bion, W. “Opacity of Memory and Desire.” In: Attention and Interpretation, pp. 41–54.
  • Young, S. “What is Mindfulness.” Available online, pp. 1–3.
  • BuddhaThe Greater Discourse on the Foundations of Mindfulness.” In: Thus Have Heard: The Long Discourses of the Buddha, 335–350.
  • Young, S. “Why Practice Mindfulness.” Available online, pp. 1–5.
  • Rubin, J.B. (2009). “Deepening Listening: The Marriage of Buddha and Freud.” The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 69 (2), 93–105.
  • Rubin, J.B. (2016). “Meditative Psychoanalysis.” The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 76 (1), 54–70.

Class 3:

Liberated Intimacy: The Psychoanalyst as Jazz Improviser

  • Ferenczi, S. (1933). “Confusion of Tongues Between Adults and the Child.” In: Final Contributions to the Problems and Methods of Psycho-Analysis. Brunner/Mazel, pp. 156–167.
  • Rubin, J.B. (1998). “The Psychoanalyst and Freedom.” In: A Psychoanalysis for Our Time: Exploring the Blindness of the Seeing I. New York: New York University Press, pp. 154–172.
  • Rubin, J.B. (1998). “The Analyst’s Authority.” In: A Psychoanalysis for Our Time: Exploring the Blindness of the Seeing I. New York University Press, pp. 173–196.

Class 4 and 5:

Flourishing and Self-Care: Myths and Definitions

  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). Introduction. The Art of Flourishing. Skyhorse, pp. 1–13.
  • Klein, M. (1960/1975). “On Mental Health.” In: Envy and Gratitude and Other Works (1921–1945). Dell.
  • Fromm, E. (1960). Zen and Psychoanalysis. Harper & Row.
  • Fromm, E. (1960). “Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism.” In: Zen Buddhism and Psychoanalysis. Harper & Row, pp. 77–141.
  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). “Expanding Inner Space.” In: The Art of Flourishing. Skyhorse, pp. 17–33.
  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). “They Can’t Steal the Moon.” In: The Art of Flourishing. Skyhorse, pp. 34–42.
  • Chi Kung: The Chinese art of mastering energy (pp. 1–13; 39–43; 45–58; 87–110; 111–120). Healing Arts Press.

Class 6 and 7:

Flourishing, Love, and Relationships

  • Aron, A. & Aron, E.N. (1986). Love and the expansion of self: Understanding attraction and satisfaction. Hemisphere Publishing Corp/Harper & Row.
  • Badiou (2009). In praise of love. New Press.
  • Brogaard, B. (2016). Love and psychoanalysis. Retrieved from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-mysteries-love/201612/love-and-psychoanalysis
  • De Botton, A. (2016). The course of love: A novel. Simon & Schuster.
  • Freud, S. (1905). Three essays on the theory of sexuality. Standard Edition, VII, 136–243.
  • Rubin, J. B. (2004). Psychoanalysts at play in the garden of love. In: The good life: Psychoanalytic reflections on love, ethics, creativity, and spirituality (pp. 45–60). State University of New York Press. 
  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). The garden of love. In: The art of flourishing (pp. 197–221). Skyhorse.
  • Wilkinson, S.M. & Gabbard, G. (1995). On romantic space. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 12(2), 201–219.(pp. 1–35). Outskirts Press.

Class 8 and 9:

The Nitty Gritty of Intimacy

  • Stolorow, R., Atwood, G. & Orange, D. (2002). From Cartesian minds to experiential worlds. World horizons. In: Worlds of experience (pp. 19–38; & 39–65). Basic Books.
  • Mitchell, S. (2002). Can love last: The fate of romance over time. W. W. Norton & Company. [Selections.]
  • Loewald, H. (1978). Man as Moral Agent. Transference and Love. In: Psychoanalysis and the history of the individual (pp. 1–26 & 27–51).Yale University Press. 
  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). No winners, no losers: Expanding interpersonal space. In: The art of flourishing. (pp. 222–234). Skyhorse. 
  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). Composting Interpersonal Conflict. In: The art of flourishing. pp. 235–247. Skyhorse.(pp. 47–55). Optimum Training Systems.

Class 10:

Flourishing in Challenging Times

  • Rubin, J.B. (2017). The art of flourishing. Skyhorse. 

INSTRUCTOR’S BIO:

Jeffrey B. Rubin Ph. D practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy and teaches meditation in New York City and North Salem, New York. He is considered one of the leading integrators of the Western psychotherapeutic and eastern meditative traditions. A Sensei in the Nyogen Senzaki and Soen Nakagawa Rinzai Zen lineage and the creator of meditative psychotherapy, a practice that he developed through insights gained from decades of study, teaching and trying to helping people flourish, Dr. Rubin is the author of the new ebook, Meditative Psychotherapy and the critically acclaimed books The Art of Flourishing, Psychotherapy and Buddhism, The Good Life and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time.

Dr. Jeffrey Rubin has taught at various universities, psychoanalytic institutes and Buddhist and yoga centers. He lectures around the country and has given workshops at the United Nations, the Esalen Institute, the Open Center and the 92nd Street Y. A blogger for Huffington Post, Psychology Today, Rewireme, and Elephant Journal, his pioneering approach to psychotherapy and Buddhism has been featured in The New York Times Magazine.

For more information, visit www.drjeffreyrubin.com.

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Titles:

Accreditation Statement

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Amedco LLC and Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis (ORIPP). Amedco LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Psychologists (APA) Credit Designation

Amedco LLC designates this activity for a maximum of up to 27.0 Psychologist contact hours.

The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Counselors: AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, ME, MO, NC, ND, NH, NE, NJ, NM, NV, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WI, WY
MI: No CE requirements
The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for MFTs: AK, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IN, KS, MD, ME, MO, NE, NC, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WI, WY
MI: No CE requirement
The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Addictions Professionals: AK, AR, CO, CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IN, KS, LA, MD, MO, MT, NC, ND, NE, NJ, NM, NY (outstate held)*, OK, OR, SC, UT, WA, WI, WY
* OK accepts APA credit for live, in-person activities. For all ethics and/or online courses, an application is required.
MA / MFTs: Participants can self-submit courses not approved by the MAMFT board for review.
The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Social Workers: AK, AR, AZ, CA, CO, DE, FL, GA, ID, IN, KY, ME, MN, MO, NE, NH, NM, OR, PA, VT, WI, WY

New York Board for Social Workers (NY SW)
Amedco SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0115. 27.0 hours

New York Board for Psychology (NY PSY)
Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0031. 27.0 hours

To receive CE certificates for the actual hours attended – please request them at the time of registration or any time prior to beginning of the conference. CE certificate fee: $25 (in addition to the registration fees). No fees charged for PD (Professional Development) certificates from ORI.

REGISTRATION AND FEES:

Tuition: $450/10-week course/trimester (can be paid in 2 installments, upon request)
Registration fee: $25/course (waived for ORI’s candidates in training)

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS are available for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for retired or disabled practitioners, or need-based or/and those who live outside of the USA.
To apply for your scholarship, please go to the registration form below.

CANCELLATION POLICY:
Full refund until the 1st session.
75% refund before the 2nd session.
50% refund before the 3rd session.
No refund from the day of the third session, but 50% of the full paid tuition will be applied to any further ORI events.

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