Introduction to Psychohistory
for Mental Health Professionals and the Curious

Course Instructor: Paul H. Elovitz, PhD
Date: November 6, 13, 20; December 4, 11, 2022 (Sundays, 10am-1pm EST)
Location: Virtual Participation Only

Post-graduate psychoanalytic education credits offered: 15 hours
Continuing Education Information
: Pending

Tuition: $450/course (can be paid in 2 installments).
Scholarships, full and partial, are available — please fill out the scholarship form below.
Registration fee: $25/course (waived for ORI’s candidates in training)

To Register for this course, please complete the Registration form

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Psychohistory probes the conscious and unconscious inner life of individuals and groups in society. Childhood, conflict, trauma, parental messaging, personality development, interpersonal relations, unconscious motivations, coping mechanisms, and creativity are central areas of concern.

Just as the psychoanalyst examines the day residue of the patient or client, the psychohistorian starts with primary sources on the subject while listening for signs of the unconscious revealing early cathexis and trauma. Neither lead with theory but instead keep the possibilities in mind made conceivable by a vast clinical and psychohistorical literature.

The emotion and life patterns of the subject are what draw the most probing questions. With living people, the possibilities that are raised can be reinforced or rejected more readily than with historical personages. Empathetic listening to the evidence and the mechanisms of defense are invaluable instruments in deepening our knowledge of lives and society. Dreams, the parapraxis, and countertransference are crucial tools of the psychohistorian who must be a diligent researcher.

This course will help clinicians to understand intergenerational elements impacting your patients. There will be an emphasis on psychoanalytic and psychohistorical research methodology. The class will be taught with a focus on case studies of a variety of influential individuals. Writing a psychohistorical article is optional but encouraged.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the end of this educational activity, its participants will be able to:

  • Discuss and analyze the basic principles of psychohistory.
  • Apply the basic principles of psychohistory and psychohistorical research to clinical work.
  • Discuss the unconscious and subliminal aspects of our society and world.
  • Apply the basic principles of psychohistory to listening to unconscious communication from patients, colleagues, politicians, and the media.
  • Discuss listening to primary sources (autobiographies, diaries, memoirs, government documents, contemporary references by associates, etc.) and provide coherent analysis of these sources.
  • Analyze the primary sources chronologically to the extent that the sources will allow to get a sense of the personality and veracity of the subject.
  • Evaluate secondary sources (biographies, dictionaries, newspaper, textbooks) and compare and contrast them with primary sources.
  • Apply psychohistorical methods of utilizing the first experiences with patients and in dealing with problems (as these may help one to understand how both the individual and society resolves issues).
  • Utilize the countertransference to the subject as a vital tool as the analyst does with the patient.
  • Utilize the empathic stance towards the subject after conducting thorough analysis of preconceived feelings and thoughts.
  • Analyze the subject of psychohistorical research with openness, avoiding psychopathologizing.
  • Discuss and analyze one’s childhood, noticing possible childhood traumas, cultural family patterns, and transgenerational phenomena.
  • Critique of patterns of transgenerational transmission of behavior and trauma (e.g., as has been well-documented in the families of Holocaust survivors).
  • Discuss and analyze openly the strong emotions encountered with patients, colleagues, and in society.
  • Analyze the origins of the unconscious motivations of the subject.
  • Discuss and analyze the indications of repetition compulsion in the life of the individual being researched.
  • Discuss and analyze the interpersonal relations of the subject.
  • Discuss the day, night dreams, and fantasies of your subject(s), including societal fantasies.
  • Compile and assess one’s own dreamwork while immersed in psychobiographical/ psychohistorical research.
  • Analyze one’s own state of being and one’s relationships (incl. the complaints or praises of the loved ones, e.g., about emotional availability) when involved in psychohistorical work.
  • Utilize theories only after examination of the psychohistorical research data is processed.
  • Utilize invaluable insights of psychohistorical methodologies and psychoanalytic training applied to the world around us.
  • Utilize invaluable insights of psychohistorical methodologies to treating their patients/clients.
  • Apply psychohistorical method to academic and clinical writing or/and writing psychobiographies.

COURSE OUTLINE:

Class 1 (November 6, 2022): INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOHISTORY

The focus of this introductory session will be on empathetic listening in the search for the unconscious repetition compulsion in both  patients and historical subjects.  What constitutes good and bad parenting will be examined, as will be the difference between the high ideals and the realities of the well-known childhood advocates Alice Miller and Lloyd deMause.

Class 2 (November 13, 2022): LISTENING FOR THE UNCONSCIOUS AND DEVELOPING METHODOLOGY

Here the focus will be on listening to the unconscious and learning the methodology for making it conscious. These points are especially applicable to the clinician and those aspiring to become psychoanalytic therapists. Splitting, repression, projection, projective identification, and other mechanisms of defense identified by Anna and Sigmund Freud will be examined psychohistorically as the bottom-up rather than top-down processes. As in clinical work, the focus in psychohistory is on the patient/ the object of inquiry, not the theory.

Class 3 (November 20, 2022): PSYCHOBIOGRAPHICAL APPROACH AND MATERIALS

Psychobiographers are like psychoanalysts in that they dig deeper into the lives of their subjects, but they also go to broader questions, such as the psychological relationship between the leaders and the led.  Course participants will be given an opportunity to make a choice on focusing on some famous people, such as Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Putin, Lincoln, JFK, Nixon, LBJ, and the Clintons.

Class 4 (December 4, 2022): THE HUMAN SEARCH FOR “THE OTHER”: WAR, PEACE, AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

How easy is for humans to find “the other,” to be feared, hated, and even killed? The class will look at the literature of hatred and the insufficiently known literature on inhibitions on killing. When it comes to killing, fantasy and reality clash, with TV’s and the news’ focus on violence.  The relationship between suicide and homicide will be probed.

Class 5 (December 11, 2022): CHALLENGES AND TRIUMPHS IN PSYCHOHISTORY

Technological change has stressed our politics and society today as celebrity is confused with achievement; democracy is threatened by information transmitted through separate echo chambers. The bright future for a psychohistory based on childhood, creativity, empathy, innovation, personality, and overcoming trauma, with more women as healers, political leaders, and psychohistorians will be examined. Autobiographies and psychobiographies will also be examined.

INSTRUCTOR’S BIO:

Paul H. Elovitz, PhD is a historian, psychoanalytic researcher, and author of about 400 publications, covering presidential psychobiography, teaching, documenting the field of psychohistory, and much more. Before becoming a founding faculty member at Ramapo College, he taught at Temple, Rutgers, and Fairleigh Dickinson universities.  He is trained as a psychoanalyst and practiced for almost 30 years before retiring to devote more time to scholarship and teaching. In 2019, his psychoanalytic institute honored him with the title Research Psychoanalyst. His recent edited volume, The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (2021), contains autobiographies of 32 contributors to the field, four biographies, and one interview. It is written as a companion volume to The Making of Psychohistory (2018). Dr. Elovitz is planning now an edited volume of the lives of psychobiographers in conjunction with the establishment of the psychobiography research subgroup of the Psychohistory Forum.
Dr. Paul H. Elovitz is a founding member and past president of the International Psychohistorical Association (1978-) who continues to serve on its leadership council after presenting at all 44 annual conferences. In 1982 he founded the Psychohistory Forum to nurture psychohistorical research and continues to head its Executive Board. It has virtual and in-person meetings in New York City, as well as at international conferences. Since 1994, Psychohistory Forum started publishing its scholarship with Clio’s Psyche, of which Dr. Elovitz is the Editor-in-Chief. Currently, with a colleague from South Africa, he is starting an international psychobiography research and publication group.

Paul H. Elovitz Curriculum Vita

Paul H. Elovitz Curriculum Vita

I.      PAUL H. ELOVITZ, Ph.D.

Founding Faculty Member at Ramapo College (School of Humanities and Global Studies, my appointment is in History, Psychohistory, and Interdisciplinary Studies), 1971

Founding Editor, Editor-In-Chief, Clio’s Psyche, 1994

Founder and Director/Convener, The Psychohistory Forum, 1982

II.      EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

  • New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis  — Teaneck, NJ — 1973–1980
    Certified by the NJI as a “Research Psychoanalyst” — Teaneck, NJ — 2019
  • National Psychological Ass. for Psychoanalysis — New York, NY — 1973
  • National Psychological Assoc. for Psychoanalysis (NPAP)  — New York, NY — 1973
  • D. Rutgers University, M.A. Rutgers University — New Brunswick, NJ — 1969
  • A. University of Connecticut (Completed one semester in the Rutgers Political Science Dept.) — Storrs, CT

INFORMATION ON MY GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION 

DOCTORAL FIELDS

Major:   Modern European History, 1789–                  Modern English History, 1640-

Minor:  Ancient Greece and the Hellenistic World      American Economic History

Dissertation: Airy and Salubrious Factories” or “Dark Satanic Mills?” Some Early Reactions to the Impact of the Industrial Revolution on the English Working Classes

FORMAL POSTGRADUATE PSYCHOLOGIAL EDUCATION

For five years I took a program of courses at the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis (NJI)—a charter member of the National Accreditation Association for Psychoanalysis (NAAP).  These seminar courses met on alternate weeks for 1–1/2 hours.  Papers were required in most courses after the second year.  Almost all of the professors had doctoral degree.  After the completion of the five-year program of course work, I took another several years of courses and seminars.  With nine psychoanalysts I was in control analysis (case supervision), typically for a year or more with each of them.  This was for a total of over ten years and was invaluable training.  For nine months I volunteered at the , Rockland Psychiatric Hospital.  For many years I worked in the NJI Low Cost Clinic while starting my own psychotherapy practice.

III.      PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE OUTSIDE OF RAMAPO COLLEGE

A. FULL TIME POSITIONS

  • Assistant Professor Temple University — Amber Campus             1968–1971
  • Research Fellowship Rutgers University                                          1967–1968
  • Instructor Temple University — Philadelphia Campus    1965–1967

B. ADJUNCT POSITIONS

  • Teaching Assistant Rutgers University – New Brunswick            1963–1965
  • Adjunct Professor Middlesex Community College — Edison       1969–1971
  • Adjunct Professor Fairleigh Dickinson University – Teaneck     1971
  • Part-time Instructor Fairleigh Dickinson University – Madison    1964
  • Invited to join the NJI and the ORI institutes in 2022 to teach psychohistory 2021

C. PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC EXPERIENCE

I maintained a small psychotherapy practice for over a quarter century, mostly at the Psychoanalytic Clinic, A.K.A. Low Cost Clinic in Teaneck which improved my work as a psychohistorian.  I also maintained a private practice in Ridgewood and later in Franklin Lakes.  In the early 21st century I relinquished psychotherapeutic work to devote more time to editing, scholarship, and teaching.

IV.      MOST OF THE HISTORICAL AND INTERDISPCIPLINARY COURSES TAUGHT

In the Years (AY Fall 2014-Sp 2020)

LEVELCOURSEGENERAL ED.TOTAL CREDITS
INTD 101First Year SeminarX20.00
HIST 101Introduction to U.S. History IX  4.00
HIST 102Introduction to U.S. History IIX  8.00
HIST 105Western Studies IX  4.00
HIST 110Modern World CivilizationsX36.00
AIID 201Studies in the Arts and HumanitiesX24.00
PHIL 304Self ‑GrowthX8.00
HIST 219Children and Youth in AmericaX 4.00
HIST 25519th Century EuropeX  4.00
HIST 25720th Century EuropeX 4.00
HIST 357Hitler, Holocaust and Genocide24.00
HIST 394War, Peace and Conflict Resolution 4.00

Most of the Additional Courses I Have Taught at Ramapo Since 1971

Psychology of Political LeadershipWar Through FilmRussian Revolutions
Psychology of CreativityManhood: What Makes a ManDemocracy and the Internet
Psychology of War and PeacePsychological Interpret. of FilmAmerican Economic History
Explorations in Family HistoryPsychology of GreatnessTechnology and Social Change
Darwin, Freud, and MarxPresidential Elections18th Century Intellectual History
Leadership & Career Development9/11 & Psychology of TerrorismGerman History
Psychohistory and SocietyTutorial on IdentityEnglish History: 1800-Present
MALS: Winners/Losers in PoliticsPresidential ElectionsNapoleon, Stalin, and Hitler

V.      SCHOLARSHIP

A. EDITORIAL LEADERSHIP

Background:  I founded Clio’s Psyche: Understanding the “Why” of Culture, Current Events, History, and Society in 1994 and have been its editor-in-chief since then.  There have been over 50 special issues, 17 special features, and 16 symposia since the publication’s founding.  I conceived of, mostly solicited the authors for, and have been the lead editor for over 60 of these.  This scholarly quarterly has a comprehensive system of double-blind refereeing with referees not necessarily coming from the field of psychohistory.  (Among the Ramapo community Former Acting Provost Edward Cody, former History Convener Carter Meyer, and Professor Ronald Hayashida and Carter Jones Meyer are examples of three such Ramapo colleagues who have refereed for it.)  In the fall issue of 2018, there were 22 articles on the psychology and history of sexual violation and its condemnation, including a symposium article by me, entitled “Awakening from the Nightmare of the Subjugation and Violation of Women.” Below are several highlights of my editorial work followed by the list of special issues, special features, and symposia reflecting my editorial leadership. (Note that I consider editorship to be my most important contribution to scholarship.)

The authors I work with and publish come from:

Adelphi University, Ankara University, Appalachian State University, Boston University, Brandeis University, Case Western Reserve University, Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Central Connecticut State University, Colorado State University, CUNY (The City University of New York), CUNY Graduate School, Drexel University, Duquesne University, Fordham University, George Mason University, George Washington University, Harvard University, Jacksonville State University, Kansas State University, LIU (Long Island University), Loyola Marymount University (LA), Macquarie University (Australia), Marquette University, Marshall University, Mary Washington University,  McGill University, Michigan State University, Montclair State University, Northwestern University, Ohio University, Open University [Milton Keynes, UK], Open University of the University of Helsinki, Pacific University, Pacifica Graduate School, Princeton University, Rutgers University, Santa Clara University, Santa Cruz University, Seton Hall University, Shippensburg University, SUNY—Stony Brook University, SUNY—University of Albany, Suffolk University, Thomas Jefferson University, Truman State University, UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles), University of Arizona, University of California—Berkeley, University of California—Davis, University of California—Irvine, University of California—San Diego, University of Chicago, University of Colorado, University of Colorado—Boulder, University of Connecticut, University of Denver, University of Essex (England), University of Haifa, University of Helsinki [Finland], University of Johannesburg (South Africa) University of Leicester (UK), University of Maryland, University of Massachusetts, University of Massachusetts—Boston, University of Michigan, University of Nevada, University of New South Wales (Australia), University of North Carolina, University of Oklahoma, University of Oslo, University of Pittsburgh, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), University of South Carolina, University of South Florida, University of Texas—Houston, University of Toronto, University of Virginia, University of Waikako (New Zealand), University of Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Vanderbilt University, Willamette University, Yeshiva University, York University (Toronto, Canada),

Colleges

Albion College, Black Hawk College, College of the Sequoias, Connecticut College, Georgia College, Iona College, Morehouse College, Mount Saint Mary College, Northwestern College, Ramapo College of New Jersey, RCC (Rockland Community College) of SUNY, Simmons College, Smith College, St. Mary-of-the-Woods College, Williams College

Interviews

As editor I have published the interviews of over 60 Featured Psychohistorians, including Nancy Chodorow (Harvard), John Demos (Yale), John Forrester (Cambridge, UK), Carol Gilligan (New York University), Peter Gay (Yale), Lynn Hunt (UCLA), Norman Itzkowitz (Princeton), Peter Loewenberg (UCLA), and Robert Jay Lifton (Harvard).

PUBLICATIONS—Part I BOOKS

  1. Editor, The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (New York: ORI Academic Press, 2021)
  2. The Making of Psychohistory: Origins, Controversies, and Pioneering Contributors
    (London and New York: Routledge Books, 2018)
  3. Editor, Psychohistory for the Twenty-First Century (The Psychohistory Forum, 2013)
  4. Editor, Appearance and Reality (The Psychohistory Forum, 2008, 2009)
  5. Editor, Psychohistorical Explorations (The Psychohistory Forum, 2011)
  6. Editor, Special Student Edition: The Best of Clio’s Psyche, eight editions
    (The Psychohistory Forum, 1997–2005)
  7. Editor, Applying Psychology to Current Events, History, and Society
    (The Psychohistory Forum, 2006)
  8. Co-editor, Immigrant Experiences: Personal Narrative and Psychological Analysis (Cranberry, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1997). (I am the originator and co-editor, with Charlotte Kahn of City College of New York.  Specifically, I wrote the introduction, one chapter on my own family history, another on the patterns and costs of immigration, and the co-authored preface, and carefully edited all chapters.)
  9. Editor, Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990), 651 pages. (Besides editing this volume I wrote five chapters)

The 72 publications listed in Part II below are in reverse chronological order and exclude all of my more numerous (about 314 publications in Part III) in Clio’s Psyche—a refereed quarterly journal.  Since it is debatable if websites should be listed as publications, despite the enormous time they take to build, readers can go to cliospsyche.org to answer this question to their own satisfaction.  In past personnel reports to Ramapo College I have indicated which journals are refereed.  A longtime editor of the Journal of Psychohistory reports that it was refereed throughout his editorship.  The editors of The Psychohistory Review and Mentalities reported them to be refereed.  Though the years many of my articles have been invited, but I only recently began keeping a record of this and therefore do not list most of them as such.

PUBLICATIONS—Part II Articles and Chapters Excluding Books and articles in Clio’s Psyche

  1. Forthcoming: “Sherry Turkle on Conversation and Empathy Versus Artificial Intelligence (A.I.)” Journal of Psychohistory 2021 A review essay of 1983 words refereed and scheduled for late 2021 publication.
  2. “How Paul Elovitz Used What He Learned About Childhood, Leadership, Listening, and Personality to Become a Presidential Psychobiographer of Trump and Biden,” in Michael Maccoby and Mauricio Cortina, eds., Psychoanalytic Inquiry, Vol. No 527–539. Pp. 527–539 Published online: 28 Oct 2021. An invited chapter of a special issue on leadership which also will become a Routledge book.
  3. “Probing Trump’s Disruptive, Narcissistic Personality,” in Michael Maccoby and Ken Fuchsman, eds., Psychoanalytic and Historical Perspectives on Donald Trump’s Leadership: Narcissism and Marketing in an Age of Anxiety and Distrust (Routledge, 2020).
  4. A Psychobiographical and Psycho-Political Investigation of Biden and Trump in Troubled Times,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXVIII No. 2 Fall 2020, pp. 82–99.
  5. “Trump Profiteering, Racism, and Biden’s Gaffes,” Psychohistory News (Fall 2020), digitized.
  6. “A Political Psychobiographical Comparison of Presidents Richard Nixon and Donald Trump,” Psychohistory News (Summer 2020), digitized 4,445 words
  7. “A Psychobiographer’s Free Associations on the 2020 Election Presidential Free Associations on the 2020 Election,” Psychohistory News (Winter 2020), digitized, 5,833 words.
  8. “Psychohistorian Interview: Paul H. Elovitz on The Making of Psychohistory,” Psychohistory News 37 No. 3 (Summer 2018), pp. 1–5.
  9. “The Psychohistory Forum Meeting on Donald Winnicott,” Psychohistory News 37 No. 2 (Spring 2018), p. 2.
  10. “George Brown’s Commitment to Children, Communities, Human Rights, and Peace,” Psychohistory News 36 No. 2 (Spring 2017), pp. 7–8.
  11. “A Psychobiographical and Psycho-Political Comparison of Clinton and Trump,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXIII Fall 2016, pp. 90–113.
  12. “The Impact of a Psychohistorian’s Life Experience and Personality on His Career and Scholarship” (Summer, 2015),” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXII Summer 2015, pp. 53–70.
  13. “The Successes and Obstacles to the Interdisciplinary Marriage of Psychology and History,” in Jovan Byford and Cristian Tileagă, eds., Psychology and History, Interdisciplinary Explorations (Cambridge University Press, 2014), pp. 83–108.
  14. “Two of the Earliest American Psychobiographers: Preserved Smith and L. Pierce Clark,” pages 78–87 in Juhani Ihanus and Vesa Talvitie, eds., Altaalla: Juhlakirja Juhani Ihanukselle (Helsinki: Ntamo [Publishers], 2014). ISBN 978–952-215–521‑4. [The book is mostly in Finnish]
  15. “Henry Lawton’s Passion for Psychohistory,” Psychohistory News 33 #2 (Spring 2014), pp. 1, 4–7.
  16. “The Extraordinary Life and Psychohistory of Rudolph Binion,” Psychohistory News 31 #1 (Fall 2012), pp. 2–3.
  17. “Messianic Hopes, Anger, Fantasy, Fear, and Disappointment in Obama’s Presidency,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVIII Fall 2010, pp. 102–123.
  18. “Admiration, Envy, and Hatred of Jews as Agents of Change in Modern Civilization,” Mentalities 24 2010 No. 2, pp. 3–14.
  19. “Making Sense of Obama,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVIII Fall 2010, pp. 190–193.
  20. “A Comparative Psychohistory of McCain and Obama,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVI Fall 2008, pp. 98–143.
  21. “Presidential Responses to National Trauma: Case Studies of G. W. Bush, Carter, and Nixon,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVI Summer 2008, pp. 36–58.
  22. “Psychohistorical Accomplishments and Losses,” Psychohistory News 26 #3 (Spring-Summer 2008), pp. 3, 9–10.
  23. “A Conversation on Europe’s Suicidal Embrace with Hitler,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXIV Winter 2007, 255–268; with David Beisel (SUNY-RCC).
  24. “Recollections of 1978 and Reflections on the IPA,” Psychohistory News 25 #4 (Winter 2007), pp. 7–8.
  25. “Insights from Psychoanalysis and Psychohistory on Terrorism, Suicidal Terrorism, and the Search for Information on Osama bin Laden,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXV Fall 2007, pp. 162–181.
  26. “Separate Psychobiographical Tents, Separate Struggles,” Journal of Psychohistory 34 No. 1, Summer 2006 pp. 83–93 (an invited article).
  27. “Exploring the Dreams of Historical Figures: Humphry Davy, Alexander the Great, and Xenophon,” Mentalities 20.
  28. “A Comparative Psychohistorical Approach to Candidates Bush and Kerry in the 2004 Election,” The Journal of Psychohistory 32 No. 2 (Fall 2004): 109–142. (This article became the basis for a special issue of the psychology of the 2004 presidential election.)
  29. “Psychoanalytic Scholarship on the American Presidency,” pp. 135–149 in James Anderson and Jerome Winer, eds., Psychoanalysis and History (London: The Analytic Press, 2003) (an invited, refereed article; this hardcover book simultaneously appeared as The Annual of Psychoanalysis Volume XXXL).
  30. “Teaching About War in Bush’s 21st Century America,” The Journal of Psychohistory 31 No. 1 (Summer 2003): 2–10, 35–48. (This invited article was the basis for a symposium issue with comments [pp. 11–48] by professors from the following universities and colleges: Appalachian State, Brandeis, Colorado, Long Island, Merchant Marine Academy, Norwich, Ramapo, and SUNY—Rockland; refereed as a symposium).
  31. “The Activities of the Psychohistory Forum,” Psychohistory 22 No. 1 (January 2003), pp. 5–9.
  32. “A Comparative Approach to the Political Psychobiography of George W. Bush and Albert A. Gore,” Mentalities XVI 2001, pp. 49–62.
  33. Review of Lynn Gamwell, ed., Dreams 1900–2000: Science, Art, and the Unconscious Mind (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000), The Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, Spring 2001.
  34. “War, Trauma, Genocide, and Kosovo,” Journal of Psychohistory 27 (Fall 1999), pp. 188–200.
  35. “Psychohistory in the Classroom,” Journal of Psychohistory XXV (Spring 1998), pp. 340–347.
  36. “Birth Order Without Freud or Psychohistory: Sulloway as a Later-Born Darwinian,” Journal of Psychohistory XXV (Winter 1998) pp. 280–297 (reprinted elsewhere).
  37. Review of Frank J. Sulloway, Born to Rebel: Birth Order, Family Dynamics, and Creative Lives” (New York: Pantheon Books, 1996), Psychohistory Review XXVI (Fall 1997), pp. 99–102 (a refereed review article).
  38. “Analisis psicohistorico del contexto familiar, infancia, personalidad y caracter de Clinton y Dole en la campana electoral de 1996,” Psychologia Politica XIV (Mayo 1997), pp. 25–39 (a refereed journal).
  39. “Clinton and Dole: A Psychohistorical Comparison,” Psychohistory News XVI (Fall 1996), pp. 1–4.
  40. “Work, Laughter and Tears: Bob Dole’s Childhood, War Injury, the Conservative Republicans and the 1996 Election,” Journal of Psychohistory XXIV (Fall 1996), pp. 147–162.
  41. “Taking Conservatives Seriously: Childhood Punishment, Denial, Anger and Rage at Politicians,” Journal of Psychohistory XXIII (Winter 1996), pp. 269–275.
  42. Review essay of Alan C. Elms, Uncovering Lives (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), Journal of Psychohistory XXIII (Winter 1996), pp. 341–342.
  43. “General Norman Schwarzkopf’s Personality and the Ghost of Vietnam,” Mentalities X (1995) pp. 1–17.
  44. “Richard Milhous Nixon Revisited: The Haldeman Diaries,” The Psychohistory Review XXIV (Winter 1995), pp. 99–111 (a refereed journal).
  45. “Clinton’s Childhood, Personality and First Year,” IMAGO (September, 1994) (a translation of the “Childhood, Personality and Clinton’s First Year: Why Was There No Honeymoon Period?” Journal of Psychohistory article into Japanese).
  46. “Childhood, Personality and Clinton’s First Year: Why Was There No Honeymoon Period?” Journal of Psychohistory XXI (Winter 1994), pp. 257–286.
  47. “The Enigma of Norman Schwarzkopf,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Spring 1993), pp. 469–473.
  48. “Character, Cancer and Economic Regeneration in the 1992 Presidential Campaign of Senator Paul E. Tsongas,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Fall 1992), pp. 217–227.
  49. “Psychobiographical Explorations of Clinton and Perot,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Fall 1992), pp. 197–216 (co-authored with Professor Herbert Barry III [University of Pittsburgh]).
  50. “George Bush: From Wimp to President,” in Joan Zuckerberg, editor, Politics and Psychology: Contemporary Psychodynamic Approaches (New York: Plenum Press, 1991), pp. 99–116 (with Professor Glen Jeansonne [University of Wisconsin]).
  51. “Presidents Carter and Sadat: The Repudiation of the Peacemakers,” in Joan Zuckerberg, editor, Politics and Psychology: Contemporary Psychodynamic Approaches (New York: Plenum Press, 1991), pp. 143–173 (with Professor Mohammed Shalaan [Al Azhar University—Egypt’s oldest and most famous university).
  52. “Leadership Education,” in Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990).
  53. “Nightmares, Dreams and Creativity,” in Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990).
  54. “Presidential and Vice Presidential Power,” in Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990).
  55. “Stages in the Historical Dream Group Process,” in Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990).
  56. “The Holocaust in the Classroom,” in Historical and Psychological Inquiry (New York International Psychohistorical Association, 1990).
  57. “Dreams as a Psychohistorical Source,” Journal of Psychohistory 6, 3 (Winter 1989), pp.289–296.
  58. “Psychohistorical Teaching,” Journal of Psychohistory (Spring 1988).
  59. “Psychohistorical Dreamwork: Section I,” in Claire Limmer and Montague Ullman, eds., The Variety of Dream Experience (New York: Continuum Books, 1987).
  60. “The Past and Present of Psychohistory,” Journal of Psychohistory (Spring 1987).
  61. “Essay Review on Dreams,” Journal of Psychohistory (Spring 1987).
  62. “Sir Humphry Davy,” in Great Lives in History, Great Britain (Los Angeles: Salem Press, 1987).
  63. “Thomas Telford,” in Great Lives in History, Great Britain (Los Angeles: Salem Press, 1987).
  64. “The Childhood Origins of Sir Humphry Davy’s Preoccupation with Science, Magic and Death,” in Jerrold Atlas, ed., Psychology and History (Brooklyn: Long Island University Press, 1986).
  65. “The Fantasy Analysis Project,” with Henry Lawton and George Luhrmann, Journal of Psychohistory, 1985, 207–228 (I originated and coordinated this project, Howard Stein wrote a commentary on this article).
  66. “Scientific Genius and Innovation in the English Industrial Revolution: Sir Humphry Davy” in Jerrold Atlas and Joseph Dorinson, eds., The Many Faces of Psychohistory (Brooklyn: Long Island Univer­sity Press, 1984).
  67. “Ethical Issues in Psychohistory: A Symposium” Journal of Psychohistory, 1982.
  68. “Group Process at the Crossroads,” Psychohistory, 1982.
  69. “Helping People Learn,” Psychohistory, 1979.
  70. “Reflections on Psychoanalytic Education,” Viewpoints of Psychoanalysis (May 1978), pp. 7–8.
  71. “Three Days in Plains,” in Lloyd deMause and Henry Ebel, eds., Jimmy Carter and American Fantasy, 1977 (reprinted from the Journal of Psychohistory).
  72. “Airy and Salubrious Factories” or “Dark Satanic Mills?” Some Early Reactions to the Impact of the Industrial Revolution on the English Working Classes (Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, 1969).

PUBLICATIONS—Part III (In Clio’s Psyche)

  1. (As of the fall 2021 issue, I have published or am awaiting publication of about 314 articles in this double-blind refereed journal.  Note that the Featured Scholar Interviews listed below are quite demanding because of the time-consuming process of reading the works of the interviewee, making up questions, dialoguing, transcribing, and editing.  Also, there are numerous co-authored publications; for example, in the December 2005 issue, I co-authored with professors from the following universities: Colorado, Connecticut—Storrs, Duquesne, and George Washington. Included are a number of articles with commentaries by a variety of colleagues.)
  2. “Spaces We Create, Enjoy, Fear, and Live in During a Pandemic,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Winter 2022): 2698 words. Successfully refereed, TBA.
  3. “Claude-Hélène Mayer: A Multifaceted Psychobiographer in Two Cultures,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Winter 2022): 4,123 words. Being refereed.
  4. “Degrees of Suspicion and Paranoia: The Need for More In-Depth Psychohistorical Analysis,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Winter 2022): Successfully refereed, TBA.
  5. “David R. Beisel: Extraordinary Psychohistorian and Colleague.” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 1–8.
  6. “Danielle Knafo: The Psychology of Creativity and Perversion,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 106–117 (Peter Petschauer was the secondary author).
  7. “Coping with Anxiety in Our Fearful Digital World,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 40–46.
  8. “Learning and Helping People Learn,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 96–100.
  9. “Our Virtual Psychohistory Forum Meeting on Paranoid Politics,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 117–118.
  10. “Psychohistorical Reflections on the January 6th Insurrections,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 285–287.
  11. “The Psychohistory Forum Roundtable on the January 6th Insurrections,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 273–285 (one of 11 commentators on the insurrection).
  12. “An Optimist Says Healing Will be a Long Endeavor,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 309–312.
  13. “Introduction to Psychohistorical and Psychoanalytic Teaching,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 315–318 (introduction to “On Healing America” with responses by colleagues).
  14. “Virtually Teaching the Election and a Survey of Civilization,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 327–333.
  15. “Jerrold Post: CIA Psychobiographer (1934–2020)” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 394–396.
  16. “Setting a More Humane Agenda while Listening to Trump Supporters,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 2, (Winter 2021): 150 (response in “On Healing America”).
  17. “A Response to Rozentsvit and the Dilemmas of a Caregiver,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 2, (Winter 2021): 193–196 (in the Inna Rozentsvit’s “The Meaning of Life Among Caregivers” symposium).
  18. “Free Associations on Why I Never Liked Woody Allen,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 2, (Winter 2021): 208–210 (in the Marilyn Fabe’s “Woody Allen’s Psychological Slapstick” symposium).
  19. “The Forum’s First Virtual Meeting: The 2020 Election,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 2, (Winter 2021): 258–260.
  20. “In Memoriam: William R. Meyers—Advocate for Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 2, (Winter 2021): 268.
  21. “President Biden Would be an Empathetic Healer and Knowledgeable Problem Solver: Not a Disruptive Narcissist,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 1, (Fall 2020): 27–30 (in the Michael Maccoby, “The President We Need” Symposium).
  22. “When a Psychoanalyst Marries a Historian: Brookhiser and Safer,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 1, (Fall 2020): 46–55.
  23. “COVID-19, Denial, Mourning, George Floyd, and Healing Our Losses,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 1, (Fall 2020): 67–72.
  24. “Exploring My Impulse for Service,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 265–272.
  25. “Free Associations on Election 2020: What Politicians Mean to Us,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 313–320.
  26. “Insights on Trump from a Pathbreaking New Book,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 322–328.
  27. A Finnish Psychohistorian: Juhani Ihanus,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 328–340. As second author with Professor Denis O’Keefe of NYU.
  28. “Loss and Trauma Incurred in the Search for Life in America,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 383–385.
  29. “Love, Attachment, Nurturance, and Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 2, (Winter 2020): 215–218.
  30. “The Builders of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 1–5.
  31. “Reflections on the Contagion of Domestic Gun Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 92–95.
  32. “Erik Erikson Revisited,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 105–107.
  33. “Psychoanalysts Need to Apply Their Knowledge to the Public Arena,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 111–113.
  34. “How My Greatest Trauma Helped to Shape My Life,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 242–246.
  35. “Jacques Szaluta: Child in the Holocaust and Psychohistorian,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 279–290. This is a featured scholar interview that I did with Ken Fuchsman of the University of Connecticut.
  36. An Ego Ideal of My Youth: Lincoln’s Foreshadowing Dream and the Question of Guilt,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 309–312.
  37. “Kleinian Wild Speculations on Trump,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 350–352.
  38. “Commentaries by the Makers [of Psychohistory] and Psychohistory’s Next Assignment,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 2, (Winter 2019): 204–209. This was a response to 13 positive commentaries on my book, The Making of Psychohistory (2018). Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 2, (Winter 2019): 204–209.
  39. A Presidential Psychobiographer Remembers Bush and McCain,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 2, (Winter 2019): 223–227.
  40. “Awakening from the Nightmare of the Subjugation and Violation of Women,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 1, (Fall 2018): 1–8 (There were four responses to this symposium article.
  41. “Elovitz’ Response to the Awakening Symposium Commentaries,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 1, (Fall 2018): 22–26.
  42. “Todd Schultz: Psychobiographer of Creative Lives,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 1, (Fall 2018): 88–97.
  43. “Reflections on Dependency in the Life Cycle, History, and Society,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 3, (Spring 2018): 293–301.
  44. “Marilyn Charles: Featured Clinician Scholar,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 3, (Spring 2018): 301–314.
  45. “The Jailing and Disillusionment of Red Rose,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 3, (Spring 2018): 346–355.
  46. “James Anderson: Psychobiographer and Psychoanalyst” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 192–206.
  47. “Probing Gender, Political Correctness, and Trump” (Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 234–237)
  48. “The History of Psychohistory” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 237–240.
  49. “Anderson on Donald W. Winnicott,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 240–242
  50. “Appreciating the Contributions of Bob Lentz and Dick Booth,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 229–230.
  51. “The Implications of Trump’s Need for Conflict on His Presidency,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 1, (Summer 2017): 63–71. The lead article in the Trump Symposium that seven colleagues from three countries commented on. “Teaching the 2016 Election,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 1, (Summer 2017): 56–62.
  52. “Why Hillary Lost: Economic, Political, Psychobiographical, and Psychohistorical Factors,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 1, (Summer 2017): 99–108 (A Dialogue with Ken Fuchsman of the University of Connecticut).
  53. “Reconsidering Freud’s Death Drive in Our Era of Suicide, and Suicidal Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 230–237. Half of a two part symposium that nine colleagues from three continents commented on.
  54. “Ambivalence about Freud’s Death Instinct and Diverse Views of Suicide” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 277–280.
  55. “Ken Fuchsman: Scholar of the Human Condition,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 310–325.
  56. “Bruce Mazlish (1923–2016): In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 326–328.
  57. “Psychohistorical Insights on the 2016 Election, Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 328–330. As second author to David Cifelli.
  58. “Reflections on How People and Society Change,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 103–115. A symposium article with ten commentaries from authors in Germany, the UK, and the US.
  59. “Varieties of Individual and Societal Change,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 146–150.
  60. “David Lotto: Featured Journal of Psychohistory Editor,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 197–207.
  61. “Presidents as Fathers,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 212–214.
  62. Memorial: “John Forrester: Cambridge Historian of Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 214–216. (With David Cifelli)
  63. “A Presidential Psychobiographer’s Countertransference to Trump,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 1, (Fall 2016): 1–8.
  64. “Fantasy Politics and an Imaginary Analysis of Hillary Clinton,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 296–299.
  65. “Reflections on Trump’s Celebrity Politics and Psychobiography,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 277–285.
  66. “Reappraising the First President Bush,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 329–331.
  67. “Death Anxiety, Murder-Suicide, and the Impact of the News,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 3 (December 2015): 123–126.
  68. “Historian, Psychohistorian: D.J Fisher,” Clio’s Psyche Vol 22, No. 3 (December 2015):168–180.
  69. “The Value of Applied Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 10–14.
  70. “A Comparison of Early Freudianism with the Psychohistorical Movement,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 20–25.
  71. Professionalizing Psychohistory and Other Issues,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 58–62.
  72. “Three Psychohistorical Journals,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 74–80. (With David Cifelli)
  73. “Insights from Psychohistorical Journal Editors,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 81–90.  (With David Cifelli)
  74. “Baltimore: Reflections on Inner City Violence,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 90–94. (With Neil Wilson)
  75. “Clifford on Freud as the Leader of Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, No. 1–2 (June-September 2015): 107–110.
  76. “Disappointed Expectations: A Presidential Psychobiographer’s Reflections,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 385–388. (Part of a President Obama in History Symposium I organized and solicited six other authors to joint).
  77. “How Electronics Empower and Frustrate Me,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 397–400.
  78. “My Digital Generation of Students,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 423–429.
  79. “An Electronic Generation,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 429–432.
  80. “Visionaries for Peace,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 476–479.
  81. “Reflections on Why Humans Are Better Off,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2014): 245–256.
  82. Deepening Our Knowledge of What It Means to Be Civilized,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2014): 300–306.
  83. “Baseball’s Love Affair with Derek Jeter,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2014): 334–339.
  84. “Brainstorming about the Civilizing Process,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2014): 355–358.
  85. “Women’s Hard Choices and Hillary’s Choice,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 170–174.
  86. “Historical Reflections on Women,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 149–152.
  87. “Feminist Historian Joan Wallach Scott,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 178–186.
  88. “Perspectives on Terrorism on the High Seas,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 222–226.
  89. “Jews Caught between Hitler and Stalin,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 13–18.
  90. “Henry Lawton: Psychohistorian and Social Worker,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 68–73.
  91. “Working, Laughing, and Learning Together,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 75–77.
  92. “Celebrating a Cambridge University Press Psychology and History Book,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 100–106. (This is an interview of me as an author by Prof. Ken Fuchsman of UConn.)
  93. “Castelloe’s Film Applying Volkan’s Peacemaking Model to American Violence,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 116–118. (With Molly Castelloe)
  94. “Wine Cheese and Conscience at the Forum,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 4 (March 2014): 499–502.
  95. “Featured Psychological Diplomat: Joseph V. Montville,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 329–341.
  96. “Psychohistorians Lifton, deMause, and Volkan,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 341–350.
  97. “The Psychology of Humor Meeting Report,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013):260–362.
  98. “Arnold Richards: Disseminating Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 265–270.
  99. “Editor’s Introduction,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2013): 127–128.
  100. “Varieties of Empathy,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2013): 1–13.
  101. “Friedman’s Psychobiographical Comparison of Fromm and Erikson,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2013): 86–96.
  102. “A Collage of Impressions of the Newtown Massacre” (Clio’s Psyche, Vol. 19 No. 4 (March 2013): 411–456 (as editor).
  103. “Some Thoughts on Our Online Discussion,” (Clio’s Psyche, Vol. 19 No. 4 (March 2013): 457–460. (With Professor Peter Petschauer of Appalachian State University)
  104. “How a Dream Helps a Psychohistorian Learn about the School Shootings and His Unconscious,” (Clio’s Psyche, Vol. 19 No. 4 (March 2013): 460–464).
  105. “Human Reactions to Nature’s Violence,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 302–305.
  106. “Featured Author Interview with Jennifer Burns on Ayn Rand, Paul Ryan, and Modern Conservatism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 322–331. (Burns is a Stanford University professor)
  107. “The Reduction of Violence in an Era of Apocalyptic Danger,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 311–314.
  108. “A Psychobiographer’s Ruminations on Ayn Rand,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 332–334.
  109. “The Historian’s Life of Joseph Dowling,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 355–356.
  110. “The Psychiatrist/Psychoanalyst as Psychohistorian: Sander Breiner,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 359–360.
  111. “Romney: Identifying with and Pursuing His Father’s Dreams,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 2 (September 2012): 127–133.
  112. “Remembering Mary Lambert,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 2 (September 2012): 239
  113. “Betty Glad: In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 2 (September 2012): 240–241
    (with Nicole Alliegro).
  114. “A Loewenberg Select Bibliography,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 1 (June 2012): 53–57
    (with Caitlin Adams).
  115. “Dimensions of the Animal-Human Connection,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, 1 (June 2012):  1–7.
  116. “Election 2012 Free Associations and Psychohistorical Questions” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4 (March 2012): 463–73.
  117. “Remembering Andrew Brink’s Search for Knowledge” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4
    (March 2012):  479–82.
  118. “The Psychoanalytic Life of Elisabeth Young-Bruehl” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4
  119. March 2012: 490–91.
  120. “Creativity Flows from Our Lives,” Clio’s Psyche 18, No. 3 (December 2011): 265–269.
  121. “The Life and Art of Friendship of Rudolph Binion,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 2 (September 2011): 200–209.
  122. “The Life of Victor Wolfenstein,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 2 (September 2011): 238–242 (with Bob Lentz).
  123. “Washington Policy Makers Need to Consult with Beisel,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 2 (September 2011): 141–43.
  124. “Extreme American Exceptionalism Narcissism and Paranoia,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 1 (June 2011): 9–16. (This symposium article was coupled with an article on exceptionalism in foreign policy by professor Frank Summers of Northwestern University—18 colleagues commented.  They came from the many institutions including Harvard, Chicago, Colorado, York, Rutgers, Maryland, McGill, Boston, and UConn.).
  125. “Denial, Distraction, and Fantasy [in American Exceptionalism],” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 1 (June 2011): 85–91.
  126. “Daniel Rancour-Laferriere: Psychoanalytic Scholar of Russia and Religion,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 1 (June 2011): 91–102.
  127. “The Tea Party’s Battle for American History,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 1 (June 2011): 103–106.
  128. “Fuchsman and the Retreat from Marriage and Parenthood,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 4 (March 2011): 290–293.
  129. “The Riddle of Avner Falk’s Obama,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 4 (March 2011): 359‑3622.
  130. “Jews as Capitalists, Communists, Zionists, and Victims of Nationalism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 3 (December 2010): 241–244.
  131. “Editorial Board Member and Psychologist Leon Rappoport,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 3 (December 2010): 264–266 (with Ronald Downy [Kansas State University]).
  132. The Influence of Childhood Experience, “Robert N. Butler,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 3 (December 2010): 266–269 (with Nora O’Brien-Suric [The Hartford Foundation])
  133. “L. Pierce Clark: An Early Psychobiographer,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 9–16 (with Elizabeth Wirth Marvick [UCLA]).
  134. “America’s First Psychobiographer: Preserved Smith and His Insights on Luther,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 22–27 (with Elizabeth Wirth Marvick [UCLA])
  135. “The Psychological Contributions and Lives of Henry Lawton and J. Lee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 17–21.
  136. “Freud’s Theories Reflected His Needs,” Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 98–99.
  137. “Ralph Colp’s Creative Identification with Charles Darwin,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 4 (March 2010): 360–365.
  138. “Exploring the Psychological Roots of the Need to Emulate,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 4 (March 2010): 334–348.
  139. “A Psychohistorical Exchange on Barack Obama’s Family Background,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 3 (December 2009): ): 247–257 (with Ken Fuchsman –University of Connecticut]).
  140. “Reflections on Health Care and Its Reform,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 3 (December 2009): 282–292.
  141. “Psychohistorical Insights on Remembering September 11th,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 3 (December 2009): 324–333.
  142. “Anxiety, Denial, Fantasy, Fear, and Hysteria Regarding Health Care Reform,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 3 (December 2009): 220–235.
  143. “How Will You Use Psychohistory?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 2 (September 2009): 201–203.
  144. “Nancy Kobrin’s Journey from Psychoanalysis to Fighting Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 2 (September 2009): 169–182.
  145. “A Psychohistorical Retrospective of September 11, 2001,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No.2 (September 2009): 107–120.
  146. “Psychological Explorations of Economic Crises,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 1 (June 2009): 1–6.
  147. “The Life Experience and Scholarly Achievement of J. Lee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 4 (March 2009): pp. 224–30.
  148. “Love, Attachment, and Hatred in Long Term Relationships,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 4 (March 2009): pp. 275–80.
  149. “Searching for the Origins of European Identity,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No.1 (June 2009): 69–73.
  150. “Grief and Loss in the Bush Family,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 115–118.
  151. “Thinking and Laughing About Biden and Palin,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 164–168.
  152. “Ralph Colp: Darwin Scholar and Psychiatrist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 105, 160–162.
  153. “A Brilliant and Playful Listener to the Unconscious,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 57–60. [on Montague Ullman]
  154. “Montague Ullman (1916–2008): Dream Research Pioneer,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 51–57. (with Judith Gardiner)
  155. “In Memoriam: Otto Paul Pfanze,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 101.
  156. “Obama’s Dreams from and of His Father,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 70–77.
  157. “Race in America and the 2008 Election,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 64–68.
  158. “Child Abuse and Baseball: Torre and Steinbrenner,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 1 (June 2008): 19–23.
  159. “Fred I. Greenstein: Princeton Political Psychologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 1 (June 2008): 1, 33–38.
  160. “Confronting the Aging Process and Thoughts for Healthy Aging,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 130–33 (with Nora O’Brien).
  161. “Confronting Aging Meeting Report,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 124–26.
  162. “Our Disappointing Tweedledum/Tweedledee Exchange,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 146–47.
  163. “Leaders and Psychobiographical Case Studies Make a Difference,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 142–44.
  164. “George E. Vaillant: Featured Scholar on Aging Well,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 133–39.
  165. “The Art, Process, and Psychology of Aging,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007).
  166. “In Memoriam: Ben Brody (1920–2007),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007): 101–102.
  167. “Election Free Associations,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007): 84–89.
  168. (This article includes “Reading the first Credible African American Presidential Candidate”: 87–88).
  169. “Giuliani as His Father’s Son,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007): 73–84.
  170. “In Memoriam: Isaac Zieman, Survivor and Peacemaker,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 1–2 (September /June 2007 Joint issue): 33–36 (with Eva Fogelman).
  171. “Organizing International Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 1–2 (September /June 2007 Joint issue): 28–30.
  172. “Thomas Jefferson without Idealization,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 1–2 (September /June 2007 Joint issue): 1, 20–24.
  173. “C. Fred Alford: Professor of Government and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 179, 204–210.
  174. “Surviving the Holocaust and Working for a World without Genocide,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 194–196.
  175. “The Transformation of Holocaust Scholarship,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 199–201.
  176. “Free Associations on Saving Money and Enemies,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 215–217.
  177. “In Memoriam: Connalee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 224–226. With Peter Schwab of SUNY—Purchase.
  178. “Fantasies and Realities of Retirement,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 109–115.
  179. “Freedom, Enjoyment, Fear and Limitations in Retirement,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 143–145.
  180. “Victor Wolfenstein: Psychoanalytic-Marxist Scholar,” Clio’s Psyche 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 165–174 (with Bob Lentz).
  181. “Reflections on Childhood and St. Augustine,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 154–155.
  182. “In Memoriam: Charles Gouaux,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 176.
  183. “John Forrester: A Cambridge Historian of Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 2 (September 2006): 81, 87–94.
  184. “In Memoriam: John Caulfield,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 2 (September 2006): 104.
  185. “Arnold A. Rogow: In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 2 (September 2006): 102–103 (with Jeanne Rogow).
  186. “Donald Carveth: Psychoanalytic Sociologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 1 (June 2006): 66–74.
  187. “Art and Science in Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 1 (June 2006): 11–13.
  188. “The Making of Darwin’s Marital Happiness,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 4 (March 2006): 183–187.
  189. “Different Approaches to Marriage,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 4 (March 2006): 175–178.
  190. “Psychohistorical Pedagogy,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 4 (March 2006): 205–207.
  191. “Postgraduate Psychohistorical Education,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 113, 121–123.
  192. “A Dialogue on Online Education,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 130- 134 (with Kenneth Fuchsman [University of Connecticut]).
  193. “Elisabeth Young-Bruehl and the Vita Psychoanalytica,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 113, 139–149 (Judith Harris [George Washington University] was the lead author of this Feature Scholar Interview).
  194. “Using Disappointment,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 126–128 (Robert A. Pois [University of Colorado] was the lead author).
  195. “A Bibliography of the Books of Paul Roazen,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 138 (with Daniel Burston [Duquesne University]).
  196. “Guilt-Evasion, Narcissism, and Permissiveness in the Era of Watergate,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 157–159.
  197. “Reflections on the Binion Symposium,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 66–69.
  198. “Thomas A. Kohut: Historian with a Psychoanalytic World View,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 37, 49–56.
  199. “Reflections on Deep Throat,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 42–46.
  200. “The Next Assignment of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 104–106.
  201. “In Memoriam: John E. Mack (1929–2004),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 108–110.
  202. “Sue Erikson Bloland: A Conversation on Fame,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No.1 (June 2005): 1, 10–16.
  203. “Nancy J. Chodorow: Psychoanalyst and Gender Theorist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 4 (March 2005): 113, 134–143 (with Bob Lentz—Clio’s Psyche).
  204. “Some Concluding Thoughts from the Perspective of a Male Psychohistorian,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 4 (March 2005): 150–156.
  205. “The Historian’s Mindset,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 3 (December 2004): 92–94.
  206. “The Costly Group Process Experiment,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 3 (December 2004): 81–82.
  207. “Geoffrey Cocks: Historian of Film and Nazi Germany” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 35, 56- 70.
  208. “A Dialogue on Applying DSM-IV Categories to Learn Psychohistory: Lenin as Exemplar,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 40–46 (with Anna Geifman [Boston University]).
  209. “Psychohistorical Questions and Reflections on the Russian Revolution,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 46–48.
  210. “Bias, Countertransference, and Father Son Issues: A Response to Conway,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 55.
  211. “Philip Pomper: a Psychohistorical Scholar of Russia” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 1 (June 2004): 1, 13–20.
  212. “In Memoriam: Rita Ransohoff (1916–2003)” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 1 (June 2004): 27–29 (with Joan Wynn [University of Chicago]).
  213. “Carol Gilligan: The Voice of a Woman Psychohistorian” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (March 2004): 121–131.
  214. “Free Associations: Studying the Democratic Candidates,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (March 2004): 144–152.
  215. “E‑mail Identities,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (March 2004): 153–154.
  216. “In Memoriam: Robert Pois (1940–2004),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (March 2004): 161–162.
  217. “Lawrence J. Friedman: Psychohistorian,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2003): 75, 101–108.
  218. “Reflections on the Psychohistory and Economics of American m,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2003): 99–101.
  219. “Report on the November 22 Psychohistory Forum Autobiography/Biography Research Group Meeting,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2003): 116–117.
  220. “The Making and Makers of Psychohistory and Psychological Society,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 2 (September 2003): 33, 55–58.
  221. “Editor’s Introduction to The Emotional Life of Nations Symposium,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 2 (September 2003): 35 (authors of this symposium were professors from Adelphi, Appalachian State, CUNY Graduate School, Kansas State, Lehigh, Loyola Marymount University [LA], Maryland, and Toronto universities).
  222. “A Hedgehog’s Opus Reviewed by a Fox,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 2 (September 2003): 39–42.
  223. “The Second Bush Persian Gulf War,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 1 (June 2003): 3–7.
  224. “The Editor’s Classics,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 1 (June 2003): 1, 12.
  225. “J. Lee Shneidman: Historian” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 1 (June 2003): 26–30.
  226. “Henry W. Lawton: Independent Scholar and Psychohistorian of Repressed Violence” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 4 (March 2003): 157, 189–199.
  227. “In Memoriam: Lewis Feuer (1912–2002): Psychoanalytic Philosopher and Sociologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 4 (March 2003): 206–210.
  228. “The Editor’s Book Corner: Some Books on Terrorism, War, and Emotion,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 4 (March 2003): 188–189.
  229. “Perspectives on Teaching About War-Making in 2002 America,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 3 (December 2002): 125, 140–144.
  230. “Psychohistorian of the Islamic Near East: Norman Itzkowitz” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 3 (December 2002): 146–150.
  231. “A Biographer and His Subject: Ralph Colp and Charles Darwin” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 2 (September 2002): 146–150.
  232. “Children, Childhood, and Childrearing Dilemmas,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 1–6.
  233. “Elizabeth Wirth Marvick: Half a Century of Researching Childhood” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 1, 26–36 (with Bob Lentz).
  234. “Serfs in North America?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 46–48.
  235. “In Memoriam: Melvin Kalfus (1931–2002)” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 48–51.
  236. “Mourning, Melancholy, and the Palestinians,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 4 (March 2002): 165–168 (with Robert Pois [University of Colorado]).
  237. “Some of My Psychohistorical Homes,” Response to Petschauer’s “Home Symposium,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 4 (March 2002): 215–217.
  238. “Where Were You on September 11?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 3 (December 2002): 152.
  239. “Fantasies and Realities of Crime, Courts, and Prison,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 2 (September 2001): 49–55.
  240. “A Conversation with Charles B. Strozier on Heinz Kohut,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 2 (September 2001): 49, 85–90. A Featured Scholar Interview co-authored with Bob Lentz.
  241. “In Memoriam: Chaim Shatan (1921–2001),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 2 (September 2001): 102–103.
  242. “The Legalization of Life,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2001): 1–4.
  243. “Eli Sagan: Scholar of Aggression and Sociologist” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2001): 31–38.
  244. “An Intellectual Partnership: Jay Gonen and Mary Coleman” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 4 (March 2001): 167,189–198.
  245. “Psychoanalysis and History: Andrea Sabbadini” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 4 (March 2001): 212–214.
  246. “Response to Binion’s “Group Process,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 3 (December 2000): 148–149.
  247. “Presidential Free Association,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 3 (December 2000): 158–160.
  248. “A Literary Psychohistorian: Dan Dervin,” Clio’s Psyche 7, No. 2 (September 2000): 85–88. A Featured Scholar Interview.
  249. “America’s Second Woman President,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 2 (September 2000): 69–70.
  250. “In Memoriam: George Kren (1926–2000),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 2 (June 2000): 95, 98.
  251. “Mel Kalfus: Psychobiographer, Institution Builder, and Survivor” (Featured Scholar Interview) Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 1 (June 2000): 32–41.
  252. “The Elián González Obsession,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 1 (June 2000): 2, 26.
  253. “An Israeli Psychohistorian: Avner Falk” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 3 (December 1999): 122–126.
  254. “In Memoriam: H. Stuart Hughes (1916–1999): From the ‘Supporting Cast’ of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 3 (December 1999): 131.
  255. “Primary Process Online in the Age of the Internet,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 2 (September 1999): 41–46.
  256. “Intimacy on the Internet,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 2 (September 1999): 66–69.
  257. “The Creativity of Andrew Brink” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 2 (September 1999):75–81.
  258. “Laughing Away the Pain: Benigni’s Inappropriate Fable,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999): 2–5.
  259. “Political Psychologist and Presidential Scholar Betty Glad” (Featured Scholar Interview) Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999):18–25 (with Bob Lentz).
  260. “A Conversation on Political Personality: Gore, Botha, De Klerk and Mandela,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999):25–30 (with Aubrey Immelman).
  261. “In Memoriam: William J. Gilmore (1945–1999),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999): 39–40.
  262. “In Memoriam: Robert Chaikin (1947–1999),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999): 40.
  263. “The Prospects for Psychohistory and Psychoanalysis, Future of Psychohistory and Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 4 (March 1999): 117–123.
  264. “The Special Issue on Understanding the Impact of Impeachment,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 4 (March 1999): 117,143.
  265. “Clinton’s ‘Blind Spots’ and the ‘Rorschach Presidency,’” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 3 (March 1998): 69–76.
  266. “The Future of Psychohistory and Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 39–40 (with Hanna Turken).
  267. “Conclusion” [To the Special Issue, “Freud and Asimov: Two Very Different “Psychohistories.”] Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 36–37.
  268. “In Search of Isaac Asimov,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 30–36.
  269. “Fantasies and Realities of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 1, 15–18.
  270. “Linguistic Free Association: Unisex ‘You Guys,’” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 3 (December 1997): 89.
  271. “Hitler’s Self-Defeatism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 3 (December 1997): 78–81.
  272. “A Unique Dual Education: Editor’s Introduction and Personal Commentary,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 2 (September 1997): 36–44.
  273. “The Psychoanalytically-Informed Historian: Peter Gay” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 2 (September 1997): 33, 62–66 (with David Felix and Bob Lentz)
  274. “In Memoriam: Melvin Goldstein (1926–1997),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 30–31.
  275. “Space on Our Minds,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 15–16.
  276. “Reflections on Isaac Asimov,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 12–13.
  277. “Sir Humphry Davy’s Belief in Heavenly Extraterrestrials,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 7–9.
  278. “Paul Elovitz Responds,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 125–126 (counter-Response to “Response to the Unabomber,” H. J. Rodgers)
  279. “Free Associations,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 111–115.
  280. “My Motivation: Patterns and Secrets of an Immigrant Family,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 104–108.
  281. “A Conversation with Charles B. Strozier” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 97, 119–125.
  282. “Death Wish, Watch Function, and Our Security Mania,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 3 (December 1996): 93–94.
  283. “In Memoriam: Raphael Patai,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 67.
  284. “Blowing up the White House and Other Apocalyptic Violence in Independence Day,” (Film Review), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 65–66.
  285. “Whitewater and the Clintons” (Book Review), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 62–64.
  286. “Limited or Unlimited Partners?” (Book Review), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 62.
  287. “George Steinbrenner and the Yankees: Personality and Sports Psychology,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 56–58.
  288. “International Free Associations: [A Satirical Pravda] Obituary,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 54–55.
  289. “Free Associations: American Politics,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 48–54.
  290. “The Cry of a Child: The Unabomber Suspect’s Explosive Family Boundaries,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 33–36 (co-authored with Michele O’Donnell, a Ramapo student who went on to graduate school).
  291. “Meet the Editors,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 1996): 1–5.
  292. “In Memoriam: Marvin Goldwert (1935–1995),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 4 (December 1995): 97.
  293. “Response: The Use and Legal Misuse of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 4 (December 1995): 96 (response to “Psychohistory, Legal Procedure and Me,” by H. J. Rodgers).
  294. “Free Associations,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 3 (December 1995): 65–67.
  295. “The Advocacy and Detachment of Robert Jay Lifton” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 3 (December 1995): 45, 56–62.
  296. “Funding Psychohistory: An Interview with John Caulfield,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 1 (June 1995): 20–24.
  297. “Free Association: Violence in Our Midst,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 1 (June 1995): 15–18.
  298. “Fathers,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 1 (June 1995): 4–6.
  299. “1995 Psychohistory Forum Meeting Schedule and Abstracts,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 4 (March 1995): 18–19.
  300. “Communism: The Dream that Failed—Research Group Meetings,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 4 (March 1995): 17.
  301. “War, Peace and Conflict Resolution—Researchers’ Activities,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 4 (March 1995): 15–16.
  302. “Psychohistory, Predictions, and the Millennium,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 3 (December 1994): 14–15.
  303. “Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 3 (December 1994): 1–2.
  304. “Some of Your Definitions of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 2 (September 1994): 11.
  305. “What Strange Behavior Do You Predict for the Year 2000?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 2 (September 1994): 10–11.
  306. “Good Things in Columbia: Fungrata and Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche 1, No. 2 (September 1994): 9–10.
  307. “Health Care, Third Parties and Transference,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 2 (September 1994): 9.
  308. “Viewpoints: Why Some Arab Immigrants Choose Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 2 (September 1994): 1–2.
  309. “What is the Psychohistory Forum?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1994): 7.
  310. “How Do You Define Psychohistory?” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1994): 5.
  311. “Communism: The Dream that Failed,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No.1 (June 1994): 3–4.
  312. “Viewpoints: Richard Milhous Nixon’s Final Resurrection,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1994): 2.
  313. “Questions About Baruch Goldstein’s Path to the Hebron Massacre,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1994): 2.
  314. “Welcome to Clio’s Psyche,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1994): 1.

C. PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS (Partial Listing)

(Since 1976 I have made over 150 professional presentations to 18 different scholarly groups: overwhelmingly at international [over 60 in Asia, Europe and North America], partly at national [in Colombia and US], and also at regional [over 30 in Denver, New York, Philadelphia, San Diego, and Washington] conferences and seminars.)

About a half dozen professional presentations in the last three or four years are either missing form this list or only partially cited. They are mostly on political psychobiography and the builders of psychobiography.

  1. “A Psychobiographical and Psycho- Political Analysis of Trump and Biden,” at the 43st International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: May 19, 2020.
  1. Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society conference
  1. Biden Forum talk with Dan McAdams (Northwestern) and O’Keefe (NYU) on Donald Trump
  1. A Political Psychobiographical Comparison of Presidents Richard Nixon and Donald Trump,” 42st International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: May 22–24, 2019.
  1. “The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory,” 42st International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: May 22–24, 2019. I organized and chaired the panel comprised of Professors Robert Samuels (U. California), David Beisel (SUNY-RCC), and David Lotto (Editor, Journal of Psychohistory).
  1. “Dystopian Presidents Donald Trump and Richard Nixon and The Making of Psychohistory,” at the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society meetings at Rutgers University on October 19–20, 2018 in a panel I organized with Denis O’Keefe (NYU) and Ken Fuchsman (UConn).
  2. “The Making of Psychohistory” 41th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: May 31, 2018. In a panel on my book which I organized and responded to with David Beisel (SUNY-RCC). Lawrence Friedman (Harvard), Ken Fuchsman (UConn) and Charles Strozier (John Jay College of CUNY).
  3. “The Pioneers of Psychohistory and My Personal Dilemmas,” Presentation at Fordham University on September 16, 2917. Two Fordham University professors also gave papers in a three-hour session.
  4. “Trump’s Disruptive Personality and Need for Conflict,” 40th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 1, 2017. In a panel I organized.
  5. “David Beisel: Psychohistorian Extraordinaire,” 40th International Psychohistorical     Association meetings at New York University: June 1, 2017.
  6. “Suicide and Suicidal Terrorism in the Light of Freud’s Death Drive,” 40th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 1, 2017.
  7. Psychohistory’s Next Agenda: How People and Society Change,” 39th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 1, 2016. A plenary address.
  8. “A Psychobiographical and Psycho-Political Comparison of Clinton and Trump,” 39th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 2, 2016.
  9. “A Psychohistorical Comparison of the Earlier Freudian and Psychohistorical Movements,” 38th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 4, 2015.
  10. “The Value and Limitations of Applied Psychohistory,” 38th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 3, 2015.
  11. “Humankind Has Never Been as Civilized and Well Off Materially as at the Present Time,” at the Psychohistory Forum in Manhattan on September 20, 2014. Professor Kenneth A. Fuchsman of the University of Connecticut presented the contrary view at the same meetings.
  12. “Psychohistory in the 21st Century, 37th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 5, 2014.
  13. “Henry Lawton Memorial,” 37th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 5, 2014.
  14. “The History of the Modern Psychohistory.” 36th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 5, 2013. The Keynote Address.
  15. “Empathy and Civilization,” 36th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 6, 2013. A panel I set up with professors from Guelph and UConn.
  16. “History, Politics, and Psychobiography in the 2012 Election: “A Presidential Psychobiographer’s Comparative Approach,” at the Psychohistory Forum’s October 27, 2012 election meeting in Manhattan, together with presentations by professors from UConn and the University of Pittsburgh.
  17. “Romney and Obama: Fantasy, Disillusionment, and Personality in the 2012 Presidential Election,” Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) (Rutgers—New Brunswick: October 19, 2012) meetings. Part of the panel I organized, “Electoral & Financial Illusions, Delusions, Psychology, and Realities” with professors from Adelphi and Rutgers universities.
  18. “Psychohistorical Comparison of Romney and Obama and His Republican Rival,” 35th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 7, 2012.
  19. “Update Rudolph Binion as an Extraordinary Colleague, Friend, and Psychohistorian” 35th International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York University: June 7, 2012.
  20. “Rhetoric, Fantasies, and Personalities in the Republican Nominating Contest,” The Psychohistory Forum held at the Training Institute for Mental Health in New York: January 28, 2012.
  21. “Tea Party Rage and the Political Uses of Anti-Government Anger Generated by Fear,” 34th International Psychohistorical Association (IPA) meeting (Fordham University [Lincoln Center Campus]: June 8, 2011).
  22. “How Obama’s Political Values and Personality Shape his Responses,” 34th International Psychohistorical Association meeting (Fordham University [Lincoln Center Campus]: June 9, 2011),
  23. “The Psychology of American Exceptionalism,” Training Institute for Mental Health (Manhattan: April 30, 2011).
  24. “Psychoanalytic and Psychoeconomic Reflections on the Myth of American Exceptionalism in a Time of Fiscal Recovery While Jobs are Lost,” American Psychological Association (Division 39, Section IX) (Renaissance Hotel: April 22, 2011) (invited speaker).
  25. “Social Justice and Responsibility Among Psychohistorians: Robert Jay Lifton and Others,” Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) (Rutgers—New Brunswick: October 22, 2010) meetings (I organized the panel, “Social Justice, Ethics, Economics, Greed, Atrocity in War, and Psychohistory” with four other colleagues from Rutgers, UConn, and private practice).
  26. “How Obama’s Personality and Leadership Style Influences His Successes and Failures: The View from 2010,” and “Pioneers of Insight: The History of Psychohistory,” (June 9, 2010).
  27. “The History of Political Psychology and Psychohistory,” International Society for Political Psychology’s 33rd Annual Convention (San Francisco: July 10, 2010).
  28. “L. Pierce Clark, Preserved Smith, and Other Early Practitioners of Applied Psychoanalysis” Manhattan: April 10, 2010 (in a panel with two colleagues).
  29. “Anxiety, Denial, Fantasy, Fear, and Hysteria Regarding Health Care Reform,” (Manhattan: November 7, 2009) (in a panel with two colleagues).
  30. “Psychoeconomic Insights and the Psychology of Obama’s Approach to the Economic Crisis,” Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) (Rutgers—New Brunswick: October 9, 2009).
  31. “A Psychohistorical Retrospective on September 11, 2001,” National Psychoanalytic Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP) (September 12, 2009).
  32. On June 10–12, 2009 at the 32nd International Psychohistorical Association meeting held at Fordham University, I presented “Political and Psychological Insights on the First one Hundred Days of the Obama Presidency,” and arranged for three independent study students Evan Brown, Ravi Gurumurthy, and Mathew Heitman to present the panel “Psychohistorical Insights on the Early Obama Administration.”
  33. On November 1, 2008 at the election year meeting of the Psychohistory Forum, I organized a panel on psychobiographical and psychological aspects of the election 2008. My presentation was “How Personality Factors Manifest Themselves in the Electoral Process and Resonate with Voters.”  My fellow presenters were Professor Herbert Barry (University of Pittsburgh) and David Beisel (SUNY—RCC).
  34. On October 24, 2008, I presented “Psychoanalytic and Psychobiographical insights on McCain and Obama,” at a meeting of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society (APCS) at Rutgers (New Brunswick) on a Psychohistory Forum-sponsored panel on the presidency along with educators David Beisel and Burt Seitler.
  35. At the International Society for Political Psychology’s 31st Annual Convention on July 4–7, 2008 at the Sciences Po University in Paris I set up the panel, “The Postwar Syndrome: The Politics of War and Disillusionment” with Rudolph Binion (Brandeis), “The Politics of Trauma: Iraq as Vietnam;” David Beisel, “Paris 1941, A Traumaticized City and Postwar Political Reliving;” Ken Fuchsman, “The Psychology of Political Disillusionment: The Progressives and World War I;” and me, “Iraq as a Case Study of Disclaimed Vengeance in the Interaction of Leaders and the Led;” and with Szaluta as a commentator.
  36. For the 31st Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 5, 2008, I organized and chaired the panel “Trauma and Human Development,” in which I presented “Separation Anxiety, Trauma, and the Denigration of Leaders Toward the End of Their Terms.” The other presenters were Kenneth Fuchsman, Ph.D. (University of Connecticut), “A Psychohistorical Investigation of the Grant Study of Harvard Students Prior to World War II,” and David Beisel, Ph.D. (SUNY-RCC) “Traumatized Cities: London 1941 and Berlin 1945.”
  37. I was an organizer, chair, and presenter for the panel, “Psychobiographical Explorations of Presidential Candidates” at the 31st Annual Conference of the International Psychohistorical Association at the Fordham University meetings in Manhattan on June 4–6, 2008.
  38. At the 31st Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 4, 2008 I organized and chaired the panel, “The Psychohistory of the 2008 Presidential Candidates,” featuring presentations by Herbert Barry (University of Pittsburgh) “Obama for Change and McCain for Continuity,” Dan Dervin (University of Mary Washington), “The Dream Life of Hillary Clinton,” and me on “A Psychobiography of the Candidates.”
  39. For the April 26, 2008 Psychohistory Forum Manhattan conference on “Confronting Death and Dying” I presented the short paper “Death and Dying in Popular Culture.”
  40. For the November 2–4, 2007 Rutgers Conference of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society on “Hope for Hard Times: Anxiety, Alienation, and Activism,” I organized the panel “Psychoanalytic and Psychohistorical Insights Into Anxiety, Guilt, Blended Families, and Society.”  My presentation, “Applying Psychoanalysis to Society in an Era of Anxiety and Alienation,” was followed by two papers by my colleagues, “Collective Guilt Avoidance and the Case of J. Robert Oppenheimer” and “Oedipal Anxiety in the Age of Blended Families,” which I chaired.
  41. At the September 29, 2007 Psychohistory Forum meeting in Manhattan I presented the paper, “Presidential Responses to National Trauma: Case Studies of G. W. Bush, Jimmy Carter, and Richard Nixon.”
  42. At the International Society for Political Psychology’s 30th Annual Convention on July 4–7, 2007 in Portland, Oregon I set up the panel, “National and Family Trauma and Decision-Making in Psychoanalytic Perspective.” My presentation topic was “How Presidents Deal with National Trauma: Nixon, Carter, and Bush.”
  43. For the 30th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 7, 2007, I organized and chaired the panel “The Human Costs of Trauma,” for which I presented “Traumatized New York 2001.” The other presenters were Kenneth Fuchsman, Ph.D. (University of Connecticut) “Traumatized Soldiers” and David Beisel, Ph.D. (SUNY-RCC) “Traumatized Cities: London 1941 and Berlin 1945.”
  44. At the 30th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 6, 2007 I organized and chaired the panel, “Reminiscences on the First IPA and the Prospects for Psychohistory Thirty Years Later: Dreams and Realities.”  The four colleagues participating were all initial participants.
  45. “Reflections on Suicidal Terrorism and the Search for the Biography of bin Laden,” on November 11, 2006 at the Psychohistory Forum in Manhattan. The other panel presenters spoke on “A Psychoanalytic Approach to Osama bin Laden” and “Collective Suicide in Germany in 1945.”  They were from the Boston School of Psychoanalysis and SUNY-RCC.
  46. “Understanding Death, Killing, Terrorism, Trauma, and War” at the October 20–22, 2006 Rutgers Conference of the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society. I recruited colleagues from the University of Connecticut and SUNY-RCC for this panel, which I organized and chaired.
  47. “Psychological Insights on the Enemies and the Defenders of the Open Society,” at the Psychohistory Forum in Manhattan on May 6, 2006.
  48. “Psychohistorical Explorations of Sports,” at the 29th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at Fordham University, June 8, 2006. I organized this panel, which included Professors/Psychologists Dervin, Ferraro, O’Keefe, Szaluta, and Teitelbaum.
  49. Chair and presenter on the panel, “Insights from Psychoanalysis and Psychohistory on Liberation, Oppression, Trauma, and Terrorism,” and/or a “Workshop on Teaching Political Psychology and Psychohistory” at the International Society for Political Psychology (ISPP) 29th annual meetings in Barcelona, Spain on July 13, 2006.
  50. Sports Psychology,” in Manhattan on November 12, 2005 under the auspices of the Psychohistory Forum. The panel, which I organized, was devoted to exploring the role of sports in American society.  The other presenters (Drs. Thomas Ferraro, Henry Kellerman, Christine Silverstein, and Stanley Teitelbaum) are metropolitan New York psychotherapists.  Four of the five presenters are psychoanalysts.  The chair was a historian from the University of Connecticut.
  51. “Guilt-Evasion, Narcissism, and Permissiveness in the Era of Watergate,” in Manhattan on September 17, 2005 under the auspices of the Psychohistory Forum. I was one of three presenters in this panel that I organized.  The other two were from the University of Connecticut and York University.  The chair was from the Merchant Marine Academy.
  52. “A Featured Scholar Interview of Professor David Beisel, Author of The Suicidal Embrace: Hitler, the Allies, and the Origins of World War II,” at the International Society for Political Psychology (ISPP) 28th annual meetings in Toronto on July 4, 2005. I was chair and discussant of this hour-long “Hot Books” panel
  53. “A Psychohistory Based on Adaptability, Childhood, Creativity, Innovation, Personality, and Overcoming Trauma,” at the International Society for Political Psychology (ISPP) 28th annual meetings in Toronto on July 3, 2005. Invited by Professor Szaluta.
  54. “The Psychology of the Second Bush Presidential Term,” of the panel, “Bush’s First 100 Days and Prospects for His Second Term,” at the 28th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at Fordham University, June 10, 2005. I organized and chaired this panel, which included professors from Mary Washington, Pittsburgh, and Ramapo.
  55. “Bush and Kerry as Their Fathers’ Sons and Contradictory Psychobiographical Interpretations of George W. Bush,” in Manhattan on October 23, 2004 under the auspices of the Psychohistory Forum. It was part of the panel, The Psychohistorical Aspects of Election 2004, which I organized and chaired.  The other presenters were from Ramapo, Rutgers and the University of Pittsburgh.
  56. “A Psychobiographical Comparison of George W. Bush and His Democratic Challenger,” at the 27th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at New York University, June 2, 2004. I organized and chaired the panel of which this was a part.  The other presenters were professors from Mary Washington College and the University of Pittsburgh.  The greatly expanded presentations were published as The Psychological Aspects of the Presidential Election Special Issue of the Journal of Psychohistory.
  57. “Fathers, Sons, and Brothers in the Bush Family,” at the 26th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at New York University, June 4, 2003.
  1. “The History of Psychohistory Research Project: Interim Report,” at the 26th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at New York University, June 6, 2003.
  2. “Pioneers of Insight: The Makers and Making of Psychological Society” at the 26th Annual Conven­tion of the International Society for Political Psychology in Boston on July 9, 2003. I also served as panel chair.
  3. Chair and organizer of the roundtable panel, “The History of Psychohistory, Psychobiography, and Political Psychology,” at the 26th Annual Conven­tion of the International Society for Political Psychology in Boston on July 9, 2003. With professors from UC-Davis, South Carolina, SUNY-RCC, Brandeis, Ramapo, and the Merchant Marine Academy.
  4. “Avoiding Demonization in Teaching About Mideast Conflicts” on the Arab-Israeli Conflict Panel of the Mid-Atlantic World History Association Conference on October 11, 2002 at Drew University.
  5. “Psychoanalytic and Psychological Approaches to the Study of the American Presidency” at the 25th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association at New York University, June 5, 2002.
  6. “Mourning the 9–11 Dead and the Loss of a Sense of Security During the War on Terrorism.” This is a panel of the Psychohistory Forum’s Research Group on Trauma, Mourning, and Clinical Practice at the 25th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 7, 2002.  I also organized the panel comprised of five professors and therapists.
  7. “Terror, Trauma, and the Process of Mourning the September 2001 Attacks,” at the 25th Annual Conven­tion of the International Society for Political Psychology in Berlin on July 16, 2002.
  8. “Mourning 9–11, Consequences of Trauma, and the Psychobiographical Understanding of Osama bin Laden and the Terrorists.” I organized it and presented with Professor Goertzel of Rutgers and a psychologist/psychoanalyst from New York. April 13, 2002 in Manhattan.
  9. “Applying Psychoanalysis in Teaching” at the APCS conference at Rutgers University on November 9, 2001.
  10. “Facing the Hydra-Headed Threat of Terrorism and Mourning the Tragedy of 9–11.” I was one of four presenters at the November 10, 2001 Psychohistory Forum meeting on the Impact of 9–11 and the Psychology of Terrorism.  Professor Szaluta chaired the panel comprised of Professors Javors, Goertzel, Gonen, and me.
  11. “Workshop on Using Psychohistory in Teaching World History,” at the Mid-Atlantic World History Association Conference held at Ramapo College on October 10–13, 2001.
  12. “A Comparative Examination of Bush and Gore and the First 100 Days of the New Administration” at the Twenty-Fourth Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 8, 2001. The other presenters on the panel, which I organized and chaired, were professors Herbert Barry III of the University of Pittsburgh, and Theodore Goertzel of Rutgers.
  13. “George W. Bush and Albert A. Gore Compared and Evaluated,” at the October 28, 2000 panel of the Psychohistory Forum in Manhattan. Professor Herbert Barry III of the University of Pittsburgh also presented on the panel, which I chaired.
  14. “Psychobiographies of the Election 2000 Candidates,” at the 23rd Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 8, 2000.
  15. “Children’s History” (A Keynote Presentation) at the plenary session of the Appalachian State University Conference on Children and Their Literature” in Boone, North Carolina on September 23, 1999.
  16. “Categorization, Character Assassination, and Empathy in Political Psychology” at the 22nd Annual Conven­tion of the International Society for Political Psychology in Amsterdam on July 18, 1999. The renowned leadership scholar James MacGregor Burns was chair of the session.
  17. “Clinton and America in Crisis,” at the 22nd Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 4, 1999.
  18. “War, Trauma, Genocide, and the Holocaust” at the 22nd Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 2, 1999.
  19. “Panel on the Psychohistorical Origins of War and Aggression” at the 22nd Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 2, 1999 with Beisel, Gruen, Jacobs, and Kressel.
  20. “Presidential Denigration, Public Opinion, and the Balance of Power in America,” at the Psychohistory Forum on March 6, 1999 together with Professors Betty Glad of the University of South Carolina, Herbert Barry III of the University of Pittsburgh, Ted Goertzel of Rutgers University, and Aubrey Immelman of St. Josephs College.
  21. “Sulloway’s Flawed Study of Birth Order,” on the panel, “From Adler to Sulloway, Psychological Subjectivism vs. Scientific Objectivity: The Debate Continues” on August 8, 1998 in San Diego at the Pacific Branch of the American Historical Association. The co-panelist was Professor Richard Weiss of UCLA with comments by Professor Fred Jaher of the University of Illinois.
  22. “Dual Training in Psychoanalysis and an Academic Discipline in the Making of Psychohistory” at the 21st Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 5, 1998.
  23. “Biographers and Their Subjects: Uses and Misuses of Empathy” with Professors Goodman and Simon from Skidmore College and Professor Rosenberg of Drexel University on “The Use of Empathy in Biography and Its Limits” panel at the Psychohistory Forum in Manhattan on March 7, 1998.
  24. “Psychohistory, Psychology, and Psychoanalysis at the Bi-millennium: Present State and Future Prospects” November 15, 1997 with presenters from Adelphi, the University of Massachusetts, the Brill Library, etc. at the Psychohistory Forum in New York City.
  1. “Teaching About Violence, War, and Genocide Without Encouraging Them,” in Washington, DC, at the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society conference, Psychoanalysis and Social Change: Aggression and Violence, on November 7, 1997.
  2. “Preliminary Research Findings on the Makers of Psychohistory” at the 20th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 5, 1997.
  3. “Formulating an Individual and Group Study of the Makers of the Psychosocial Paradigm” on March 8, 1997 in New York City to the Psychohistory Forum.
  4. “A Comparison of Clinton and Dole’s Childhood, Personality and Politics in Psychohistorical,” presented in Manhattan at the Psychohistory Forum’s Research Group on the Childhoods and Personalities of Candidates and Presidents on September 28, 1996. With Professor Herbert Barry III of the University of Pittsburgh.
  5. “Bob Dole, the Republican Conservatives and the Search for the Perfect Candidate,” at the 19th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 6, 1996.
  6. “Report of the Immigration Psychodynamics Research and Publication Project” on January 27, 1996 in New York City. I was one of two presenters and there were two panelists.
  7. “The Struggle to Govern in the Face of the Denigration of Presidents Bush, Carter, Clinton, Nixon and Reagan” at the 18th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 8, 1995.
  8. Chair and Organizer of the Panel Discussion on War, Peace and Conflict Resolution at the 18th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 8, 1995.
  9. “Workshop on Teaching Psychohistory and Psychohistorically,” at the 17th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 7, 1995 with Professor Beisel.
  10. “Using Holocaust Survivors in the Classroom,” at the 14th Annual Holocaust Conference at Millersville State University on April 10, 1995.
  11. “The Immigrant as Alien, Enemy, Terrorist, Savior and Human Being,” at the 17th Annual International Society for Political Psychology meetings at the University de Santiago de Compostela in Spain on July 13, 1994.
  1. “Richard M. Nixon Revisited: The Haldeman Diaries,” at the Psychohistory Forum’s Personality and Childhood of Presidents and Presidential Candidates Research Group in New York on November 19, 1994.
  1. “Multicultural Experiences and Psychology,” at the 17th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 10, 1994.
  2. “Workshop on Teaching Psychohistory and Psychohistorically,” at the 17th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 9, 1994.
  3. “The Disillusionment of Red Rose,” at the Psychohistory Forum’s Communism Research Group in New York on November 6, 1993.
  4. “Schwarzkopf’s Childhood and the Gulf War Revisited,” at the 16th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 17, 1993.
  5. “Bill Clinton’s Childhood, Character and the First Hundred Days of His Presidency,” at the 16th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 17, 1993.
  6. “Multicultural Identity: The Impact of Immigration on Four Generations,” at the New Jersey College English Association Conference, Multicultural Visions: Discovering New Perspectives, held at Ramapo College on March 20, 1993.
  7. “General Norman Schwarzkopf, The Gulf War and the Ghost of Vietnam,” at the 15th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 12, 1992.
  8. “Moderator and organizer of the Psychohistorical Aspects of Immigration Panel” at the 15th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 11, 1992.
  9. “Character, Cancer and the 1992 Presidential Campaign of Paul Tsongas” at the 15th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 11, 1992.
  10. “Psicoanalisis del Caracter de los Presidentes,” at the La Asociacion Colombiana de Psicohistoria y la Fundacion Santillana in Bogota, Colombia on May 21, 1992. There was simultaneous translation.
  11. “El Desenlace de los Conflictos y las Guerras,” at the La Asociacion Colombiana de Psicohistoria y la Fundacion Santillana in Bogota, Colombia on May 20, 1992. There was simultaneous translation.
  1. “Los Suenos y las Psichohistoria,” at the La Asociacion Colombiana de Psicohistoria y la Fundacion Santillana in Bogota, Colombia on May 19, 1992. There was simultaneous translation.
  2. “The Emotions of the Persian Gulf War: Early Research Findings,” Panel chair and presenter at the 14th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 7, 1991.
  3. “A Workshop on the Emotions of the Persian Gulf War,” at the 14th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 7, 1991 with Dr. M. Potts.
  4. “Psychohistorical Questions about the Russian Revolution,” at the 14th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 6, 1991.
  5. “The Psychodynamics of Revolution,” at the Psychohistory Forum on January 26, 1991.
  6. “The Role of the Martyr, the Enemy and the Ally in the Formation of the European Nation State: Implications for European Unification,” at the International Society for the Study of European Ideas (ISSEI) conference on September 3–8, 1990 at the Catholic University of Leuven.
  7. “The Holocaust in the Classroom,” at the 13th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 6 — 8, 1990.
  8. “The Enemy in International, National and Intrapsychic Politics,” at the 13th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 6 — 8, 1990.
  9. “Teaching the Holocaust,” at the Ninth Annual Holocaust Conference at Millersville University on April 1–2, 1990.
  10. “An Extraordinary Dream of Sir Humphry Davy,” to the C. G. Jung Society of Colorado at the University of Denver on March 9, 1990.
  11. “Leadership in Protracted Conflict,” at the International Society for Political Psychology (ISPP) meetings in Israel on June 19–23, 1989.
  12. “Descartes Dreams,” at the 12th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 15, 1989.
  1. “Presidential and Vice Presidential Power,” at the 12th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association on June 14, 1989.
  2. “Building Leadership from a Psychological Basis,” at the Rutgers University ROADMAPS TO LEADERSHIP conference on April 6, 1989.
  3. “Analyzing Presidential Character: The Role of the Historian,” presented at the Psychohistory Forum in New York, September 17, 1988. With three other scholars.
  4. “Teaching Leadership Studies,” at the 11th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association at American University in Washington, D.C., June 10, 1988.
  5. “Nightmares, Dreams and Creativity,” presented at the Psychohistory Forum in New York, November 7, 1987.
  6. “Historical Re‑creations in the Classroom,” at the 10th Annual Conven­tion of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 10, 1987.
  7. “Dreams and Creativity,” at the 10th Annual Convention of the Interna­tional Psychohistorical Association, June 11, 1987.
  8. “A Descartes Dream Workshop,” presented at the Washington, D.C. Institute for Psychohistory on February 14, 1987.
  9. “Innovations in Teaching,” presented at the 9th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 11, 1986.
  10. “A Dream Workshop,” presented at the Philadelphia School of Psychoanalysis at Drexel University on April 18, 1986.
  11. “Dreams as a Psychohistorical Source,” presented at the 9th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 12, 1986.
  12. “Encouraging Psychohistorical Scholarship,” presented at the 9th An­nual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 11, 1986.
  13. “The Creative Function of the Dream,” at the Psychohistory Forum in New York, May 3, 1986.
  1. “Sir Humphry Davy’s Creation in His Dreams of Extraterrestrial Imaginary Parents as Benevolent Supporters of His Scientific Career: The Evidence from Consolations in Travel, Or the Last Days of a Philosopher,” presented at the Inter­national Psychohistorical Association Conference at Long Island University on December 6, 1985.
  2. “Resistances to the Teaching of Psychohistory,” at the 8th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 12, 1985.
  3. “The Fantasy Analysis Project,” at the 8th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 13, 1985.
  4. “The Sons of Maternal Genius,” at the Institute for Research in History, New York, on January 7, 1984.
  5. “Teaching Psychohistory,” a workshop presented at the 7th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 15, 1984.
  6. “Innovators and Inventors,” presented at the Inter­national Psychohistorical Association Conference at Long Island University on February 18, 1983.
  7. “Scientific Genius and Innovation in The English Industrial Revolution: Sir Humphry Davy (1778‑1829),” at the 6th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 8, 1983.
  8. “The Evolution of Childhood Reconsidered: A Commentary,” at the 6th Annual Convention of the Inter­national Psychohistorical Association Convention, June 8, 1983.
  9. “The Childhood of the Innovators of the Industrial Revolution (1760‑ 1830),” at the Saturday Workshop of the Institute for Psychohistory, March 6, 1982.
  10. “Character Formation and the Gospel of Wealth According to Samuel Smiles,” at the Northeast Victorian Studies Association Meeting at Drew University on April 3, 1982.
  11. “The Childhood Roots of Industrial Creativity,” at the 5th Annual Convention of the Interna­tional Psychohistorical Association, June 10, 1982.
  12. “Personality and Economic Innovation,” presented at the 4th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 1981.
  1. “Helping People Learn,” presented at the 2nd Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association, June 1979.
  2. “The Childhood of Jimmy Carter,” presented at the 1st Annual Convention of the Interna­tional Psychohistorical Association, June 1978.
  3. “A Psychohistorical Inquiry into Jimmy Carter,” presented at the second summer workshop of the Institute for Psychohistory, 1976.
  4. “Jimmy Carter” presentation with two other scholars, at a panel at the Stockton State Psychohistorical Conference, October 1976.
  5. “Report from Plains,” presented at the November 1976 meeting of the Institute for Psychohistory in Manhattan.

D. COMING PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS:

“Two presentations, one on psychobiography and the other on the founding of the IPA,” 45st International Psychohistorical Association meetings at New York or St. Johns university: May 19–21, 2022.

E. WORK-IN-PROGRESS (both short and long term)

  • The upkeep of the website cliospsyche.org with a section on teaching psychohistory.
  • The article, “Notes on the Early Use of the Words Psychobiographical, Psychobiography, Psychohistory and Psychohistorical.” Professor Juhani Ihanus of the University of Helsinki has agreed to coauthor this article with me.
  • The book project, The Psychology of Donald Trump, Recent American Presidents, and Those Who Also Ran, based on the numerous professional presentations, articles, and chapters of books I have done since 1976.
  • Edit or co-ed the book project, The Autobiographies of Psychobiographers

E. EDITORIAL POSITIONS

  • Founding Editor and Editor-In-Chief (1994 ) Clio’s Psyche
    Chair of Clio’s Leadership Team (2017)
  • Editorial Board of A.S.P.E.R.: Journal for the Advancement of Scientific Psychoanalytic Empirical Research (2017)
  • Contributing Editor, Viewpoints of Psychoanalysis
  • Co‑Editor, Bulletin of the International Psychohistorical Association
  • Reader for Fairleigh Dickinson University and University of Kentucky presses

VI. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS (past and present)

  • American Historical Association
  • Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society
  • Conference on British Studies
  • Group for the Use of Psychology in History
  • Instructional Council, Leadership Development Institute of Rutgers University, 1988–89 (defunct)
  • International Psychohistorical Association (Treasurer, Group Process Analyst, Vice President, President, and Executive Council Member, Member of the Leadership Team 1917)
  • International Federation for Psychoanalytic Education
  • International Society for the Study of Political Psychology
  • National Accreditation Association and American Examining Board of Psychoanalysis (NAAP)
  • Northeast Victorian Studies Association
  • Psychohistory Forum, Founder, and Convener/Director, 1982

 

B. MAJOR PROFESSIONAL SEMINARS LEADERSAND WORKSHOPS

  • Film Interpretation Seminar, National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis (NPAP), 1974 Alan Roland, Ph.D.
  • Psychobiography Seminar, NPAP, 1974‑1975, 1977, 1979, 1980 Alan Roland, Ph.D.
  • Psychoanalytic Writers Group, 1977‑79     Leonard Strahl, Ph.D.
  • Therapy with Children, 1978                                                    Gladys Halvorsen, M.D.
  • Psychoanalytic Child Therapy Seminar 1978‑1980                            Neil Wilson, Ph.D.
  • Seminar in Psychoanalytic Supervision, 1979–1980 Joel Bernstein, Ph.D.
  • Seminar on American Group Fantasy, 1980–81                                     Lloyd de Mause
  • Dream Leadership and Appreciation Seminars, 1982‑1984, 1990 Montague Ullman, M.D.
  • The Fantasy Analysis Project, 1984–1985 George Luhrmann, MD.*
  • Historical Dreamwork Seminars, 1985‑1986                         Donald Hughes, Ph.D.*
  • Leadership Education Institute of Rutgers University, 1988–89             Barbara Kovachs, Ph.D.
  • Personality, Childhood, and Psychology of Presidents and Presidential Candidates (1988-) Herbert Barry III, Ph.D.*
  • The Psychology of Immigration (1990–97)                                    Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.
  • War, Peace and Conflict Resolution (1991–96)             Mary Coleman, M.D.*
  • Communism: The Dream that Failed Research Group (1993–2000) Lee Shneidman, Ph.D.
  • Biography and Personality Research Group (1999–2009) Consensus Leadership
  • Empathy and Biography Research Group (1997–1999)             Vivian Rosenberg, Ph.D.*
  • The Makers of the Psychohistory (1997-) Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.
  • Trauma, Mourning, and Clinical Practice (2001–2003) Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.
  • The Psychological Exploration of Sports (2005–2008) Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.
  • Psychobiography Research and Publication (2021-) Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.* (co-leaders Claude Helene Mayer & Inna Rozentsvit *Co-leaders in projects conceived by Paul H. Elovitz, Ph.D.

C. FOREIGN STUDY AND TRAVEL

For the purposes of research and education I have traveled to Belgium, Canada, Colombia, Egypt, England, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, The Netherlands, and Wales.

D. SOME CONTRIBUTIONS TO RAMAPO COLLEGE

  • AIS Associate Dean Search Committee, 1994
  • AIS Separately Budgeted Research Committee, Chair for 2004/2005
  • AIS Career Development Assessment Committee, Chair in 2004 & 2005
  • AIS Technology Committee, 1998–2001
  • All College Senior Seminar Committee, 1996–98
  • All College Curriculum Committee
  • Advisor and founder of the award-winning History Club, 1986–2006
  • Advisor and founder of the Job Finders Network, 1991–92
  • Co-Curriculum Committee for the Five Year Assessment
  • Chair, Faculty Seminar
  • Chair, Teaching and Tutoring Committee
  • Coordinator, Master Lecture Series with $10,000 budget
  • Development Committee
  • Four to Three Credit Task Force
  • Numerous hiring committees involving over sixty personal interviews
  • Organizer, the History Honor Society
  • Search Committee for an Academic Vice President Awards I was instrumental in creating and funding for the History Club from 2000–2005:
  • Award for Outstanding work in the Field of Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies for $200 and funded for five years.
  • The Hermitage Ramapo College History Award of $100, funded for six years.
  • The History Club Leadership Award. $100 per year, funded for six years
  • The New Jersey Historical Society at Ramapo Research Award, $100 per year, funded for 5 years.
  • The History Club Part-time Student Award ($100, funded from raised revenues)

E. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE COMMUNITY

  • Advisory Board Member, Organ and Tissue Sharing Network of New Jersey
  • Adult School Instructor
  • Evaluator for Ramapo’s “Art on the Outside” outreach program
  • Service at the Low-Cost Clinic (a.k.a. The Psychoanalytic Clinic)
  • Volunteer, Rockland Psychiatric Hospital

F. GRANTS

  • Summer Research Stipend of $1,000 for 2011
  • $1000 TLTR grant for Western Studies Website in 2005
  • A Cahill Service Learning Award for $2200 in 1998
  • Career Development Awards Four credits release time for research, 1985 $1500 for travel and research, 1989 & 1994
  • A $500 Ramapo Foundation Grant in 1997
  • $1800 grant for course development of Historiography 2008-09
  • Faculty development awards in 1993 and 1998
  • Released time for research granted 2005, 1986, 1979, 1978, 1975–76
  • Sabbatical semester for research granted for 1982, 1992, 2003
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer
  • Fellowship at Yale University, 1980

G. SPECIAL RECOGNITION/AWARDS

  • On May 5, 2019 I was honored by the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis by certification as its first and only “Research Psychoanalyst.”
  • On June 5, 2013 I was honored for my 30 years as Founder/Director of the Psychohistory Forum and 20 years as Founding Editor of Clio’s Psyche at a special luncheon at NYU.
  • At the International Society for Political Psychology’s 31st Annual Convention on July 4–7, 2008 at the Sciences Po University in Paris I was one of the experienced scholars tapped by the ISPP for its excellent young Scholar Mentorship Program, pairing a graduate student or young scholar with a veteran of the field. I was paired with an Argentinean and a Chilean student, and expect this to be an ongoing relationship.  In 2009 and 2010 conferences I also did mentoring of other graduate students.
  • Named Emeritus Advisor of the History Club with a dinner in my honor in recognition of my twenty years of service for founding and advising this very successful Ramapo College club.
  • Through the years, I have been thanked for my contributions by a variety of authors in the prefaces of their books. Two that came to mind in early 2008 are in Darwin’s Illness (Florida University Press, 2008), by Ralph Colp and Napoleon Against Himself (Charlottesville, VA: Pitchstone Publishers, 2007), by Avner Falk.
  • The Quarter Century Club at Ramapo College in about 1997.
  • Selected by the Ramapo Chapter of the Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society on May 6, 1999 as one of the first group of four faculty members to be inducted.
  • Academic Vice President’s 1992 and 1998 awards for sponsoring a student conference presentation.
  • Ramapo Alumni Association Faculty Award for Leadership, Teaching and Dedication, 1990
  • Ramapo Merit Award, 1989
  • Ramapo College Dean’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Extra curriculum, 1987 and 1995
  • Ramapo College’s first-ever Life Time Accomplishment Award for the Club Making an Outstanding Contributions to the Extra Curriculum over an extended period—18 years (2003). The plaque was given to me and the History Club President for that semester.
  • Doctoral Committee for Harriet Weinssen at the Union for Experimental Colleges, 1982–84
  • Doctoral Committee reader for Kenneth Rasmussen at the California Graduate Institute, 2006
  • Mentorship of Denis O’Keefe’s doctoral work at New York University, 2013–18 to its award
  • Membership, Phi Alpha Theta, 1963-
  • Marquis Who’s Who

H. SOME POSITIONS OF HONOR

  • President (1988–1990), Vice President, Treasurer, Group Process Analyst, and now Permanent Member of the Executive Council of the International Psychohistorical
  • Chairperson (1977–1978) of the Psychoanalytic Candidates’ Organization of the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis.
  • President (1962–64) of the History Graduate Students Organization of Rutgers University.
Paul H. Elovitz’ Mostly Psychobiographical Courses and Publications

Paul H. Elovitz’ Mostly Psychobiographical Courses and Publications

Psychobiographical Courses that Paul H. Elovitz has Taught
(While almost all of my courses include significant psychobiography, these are primarily psychobiographical)

  • Darwin, Freud, and Marx
  • Presidential Elections
  • Hitler the Holocaust and Genocide
  • Napoleon, Stalin, and Hitler
  • Psychology of Political Leadership
  • Psychology of Creativity
  • Psychology of Greatness
  • Winners/Losers in Politics: Masters Level

Articles and Chapters Excluding those in Clio’s Psyche and in Books

  1. “Sherry Turkle on Conversation and Empathy Versus Artificial Intelligence (A.I.)” Journal of Psychohistory 2021 A review essay of 1983 words refereed and scheduled for 2022 publication.
  2. “How Paul Elovitz Used What He Learned About Childhood, Leadership, Listening, and Personality to Become a Presidential Psychobiographer of Trump and Biden,” in Michael Maccoby and Mauricio Cortina, eds., Psychoanalytic Inquiry, Vol. No 527–539. Pp. 527–539 Published online: 28 Oct 2021. An invited chapter of a special issue on leadership which also will become a Routledge book.
  3. “Probing Trump’s Disruptive, Narcissistic Personality,” in Michael Maccoby and Ken Fuchsman, eds., Psychoanalytic and Historical Perspectives on Donald Trump’s Leadership: Narcissism and Marketing in an Age of Anxiety and Distrust (Routledge, 2020).
  4. A Psychobiographical and Psycho-Political Investigation of Biden and Trump in Troubled Times,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXVIII No. 2 Fall 2020, pp. 82–99.
  5. “Trump Profiteering, Racism, and Biden’s Gaffes,” Psychohistory News (Fall 2020), digitized.
  6. “A Political Psychobiographical Comparison of Presidents Richard Nixon and Donald Trump,” Psychohistory News (Summer 2020), digitized 4,445 words
  7. “A Psychobiographical and Psycho-Political Comparison of Clinton and Trump,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXIII Fall 2016, pp. 90–113.
  8. “The Impact of a Psychohistorian’s Life Experience and Personality on His Career and Scholarship” (Summer, 2015),” Journal of Psychohistory XXXXII Summer 2015, pp. 53–70. (A psychobiography of Professor Peter Petschauer)
  9. “Two of the Earliest American Psychobiographers: Preserved Smith and L. Pierce Clark,” pages 78–87 in Juhani Ihanus and Vesa Talvitie, eds., Altaalla: Juhlakirja Juhani Ihanukselle (Helsinki: Ntamo [Publishers], 2014). ISBN 978–952-215–521‑4. [The book is mostly in Finnish]
  10. “Henry Lawton’s Passion for Psychohistory,” Psychohistory News 33 #2 (Spring 2014), pp. 1, 4–7.
  11. “The Extraordinary Life and Psychohistory of Rudolph Binion,” Psychohistory News 31 #1 (Fall 2012), pp. 2–3.
  12. “Admiration, Envy, and Hatred of Jews as Agents of Change in Modern Civilization,” Mentalities 24 2010 No. 2, pp. 3–14.
  13. “Making Sense of Obama,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVIII Fall 2010, pp. 190–193.
  14. “A Comparative Psychohistory of McCain and Obama,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVI Fall 2008, pp. 98–143.
  15. “Presidential Responses to National Trauma: Case Studies of G. W. Bush, Carter, and Nixon,” Journal of Psychohistory XXXVI Summer 2008, pp. 36–58.
  16. “Exploring the Dreams of Historical Figures: Humphry Davy, Alexander the Great, and Xenophon,” Mentalities 20.
  17. “A Comparative Psychohistorical Approach to Candidates Bush and Kerry in the 2004 Election,” The Journal of Psychohistory 32 No. 2 (Fall 2004): 109–142. (This article became the basis for a special issue of the psychology of the 2004 presidential election.)
  18. “Psychoanalytic Scholarship on the American Presidency,” pp. 135–149 in James Anderson and Jerome Winer, eds., Psychoanalysis and History (London: The Analytic Press, 2003) (an invited, refereed article; this hardcover book simultaneously appeared as The Annual of Psychoanalysis Volume XXXL).
  19. “A Comparative Approach to the Political Psychobiography of George W. Bush and Albert A. Gore,” Mentalities XVI 2001, pp. 49–62.
  20. “Analisis psicohistorico del contexto familiar, infancia, personalidad y caracter de Clinton y Dole en la campana electoral de 1996,” Psychologia Politica XIV (Mayo 1997), pp. 25–39 (a refereed journal).
  21. “Clinton and Dole: A Psychohistorical Comparison,” Psychohistory News XVI (Fall 1996), pp. 1–4.
  22. “Work, Laughter and Tears: Bob Dole’s Childhood, War Injury, the Conservative Republicans and the 1996 Election,” Journal of Psychohistory XXIV (Fall 1996), pp. 147–162.
  23. “General Norman Schwarzkopf’s Personality and the Ghost of Vietnam,” Mentalities X (1995) pp. 1–17.
  24. “Richard Milhous Nixon Revisited: The Haldeman Diaries,” The Psychohistory Review XXIV (Winter 1995), pp. 99–111 (a refereed journal).
  25. “Clinton’s Childhood, Personality and First Year,” IMAGO (September, 1994) (a translation of the “Childhood, Personality and Clinton’s First Year: Why Was There No Honeymoon Period?” Journal of Psychohistory article into Japanese).
  26. “Childhood, Personality and Clinton’s First Year: Why Was There No Honeymoon Period?” Journal of Psychohistory XXI (Winter 1994), pp. 257–286.
  27. “The Enigma of Norman Schwarzkopf,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Spring 1993), pp. 469–473.
  28. “Character, Cancer and Economic Regeneration in the 1992 Presidential Campaign of Senator Paul E. Tsongas,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Fall 1992), pp. 217–227.
  29. “Psychobiographical Explorations of Clinton and Perot,” Journal of Psychohistory XX (Fall 1992), pp. 197–216 (co-authored with Professor Herbert Barry III [University of Pittsburgh]).
  30. “George Bush: From Wimp to President,” in Joan Zuckerberg, editor, Politics and Psychology: Contemporary Psychodynamic Approaches (New York: Plenum Press, 1991), pp. 99–116 (with Professor Glen Jeansonne [University of Wisconsin]).
  31. “Presidents Carter and Sadat: The Repudiation of the Peacemakers,” in Joan Zuckerberg, editor, Politics and Psychology: Contemporary Psychodynamic Approaches (New York: Plenum Press, 1991), pp. 143–173 (with Professor Mohammed Shalaan [Al Azhar University—Egypt’s oldest and most famous university).
  32. “Sir Humphry Davy,” in Great Lives in History, Great Britain (Los Angeles: Salem Press, 1987).
  33. “Thomas Telford,” in Great Lives in History, Great Britain (Los Angeles: Salem Press, 1987).
  34. “The Childhood Origins of Sir Humphry Davy’s Preoccupation with Science, Magic and Death,” in Jerrold Atlas, ed., Psychology and History (Brooklyn: Long Island University Press, 1986).
  35. “Scientific Genius and Innovation in the English Industrial Revolution: Sir Humphry Davy” in Jerrold Atlas and Joseph Dorinson, eds., The Many Faces of Psychohistory (Brooklyn: Long Island Univer­sity Press, 1984)

   Additional Publications

(In Clio’s Psyche: A double blind referee’s journal)

I’m including my psychobiographical interviews and memorials except for the shortest

In memorials there is a balance between respecting the recently deceased, many of whom were my friends or respected colleagues, and portraying their personalities and lives accurately.  While eliminating most short psychobiographical we inclined publications, I’ve left in some because I thought they provided some valuable insights into the psychobiographical process.  I have to say that I do not remember the particulars of the early articles so I may have included or excluded some inappropriately.

  1. “Claude-Hélène Mayer: A Multifaceted Psychobiographer in Two Cultures,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Winter 2022): 4,123 words. Being refereed.
  2. “David R. Beisel: Extraordinary Psychohistorian and Colleague.” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 1–8.
  3. “Danielle Knafo: The Psychology of Creativity and Perversion,” Clio’s Psyche 28, no. 1, (Fall 2021): 106–117 (Peter Petschauer was the secondary author).
  4. “Jerrold Post: CIA Psychobiographer (1934–2020)” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 3, (Spring 2021): 394–396.
  5. “President Biden Would be an Empathetic Healer and Knowledgeable Problem Solver: Not a Disruptive Narcissist,” Clio’s Psyche 27, no. 1, (Fall 2020): 27–30 (in the Michael Maccoby, “The President We Need” Symposium).
  6. “Insights on Trump from a Pathbreaking New Book,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 322–328.
  7. A Finnish Psychohistorian: Juhani Ihanus,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 328–340. As second author with Professor Denis O’Keefe of NYU.
  8. “Loss and Trauma Incurred in the Search for Life in America,” Clio’s Psyche 26, no. 3, (Spring 2020): 383–385.
  9. “Love, Attachment, Nurturance, and Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 2, (Winter 2020): 215–218.
  10. “The Builders of Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 1–5.
  11. “Reflections on the Contagion of Domestic Gun Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 92–95.
  12. “Erik Erikson Revisited,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 26, no. 1, (Fall 2019): 105–107.
  13. “Jacques Szaluta: Child in the Holocaust and Psychohistorian,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 279–290. This is a featured scholar interview that I did with Ken Fuchsman of the University of Connecticut.
  14. An Ego Ideal of My Youth: Lincoln’s Foreshadowing Dream and the Question of Guilt,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 3, (Spring 2019): 309–312.
  15. A Presidential Psychobiographer Remembers Bush and McCain,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 2, (Winter 2019): 223–227.
  16. “Todd Schultz: Psychobiographer of Creative Lives,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 25, no. 1, (Fall 2018): 88–97.
  17. “Marilyn Charles: Featured Clinician Scholar,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 3, (Spring 2018): 301–314.
  18. “The Jailing and Disillusionment of Red Rose,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 3, (Spring 2018): 346–355.
  19. “James Anderson: Psychobiographer and Psychoanalyst” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 2, (Winter 2018): 192–206.
  20. “The Implications of Trump’s Need for Conflict on His Presidency,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 1, (Summer 2017): 63–71. The lead article in the Trump Symposium that seven colleagues from three countries commented on.
  21. “Why Hillary Lost: Economic, Political, Psychobiographical, and Psychohistorical Factors,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 24, no. 1, (Summer 2017): 99–108 (A Dialogue with Ken Fuchsman of the University of Connecticut).
  22. “Reconsidering Freud’s Death Drive in Our Era of Suicide, and Suicidal Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 230–237. Half of a two part symposium that nine colleagues from three continents commented on.
  23. “Ken Fuchsman: Scholar of the Human Condition,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 310–325.
  24. “Bruce Mazlish (1923–2016): In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 3, (Spring 2017): 326–328.
  25. “David Lotto: Featured Journal of Psychohistory Editor,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 197–207.
  26. Memorial: “John Forrester: Cambridge Historian of Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 2, (Winter 2017): 214–216. (With David Cifelli)
  27. “A Presidential Psychobiographer’s Countertransference to Trump,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 23, no. 1, (Fall 2016): 1–8.
  28. “Fantasy Politics and an Imaginary Analysis of Hillary Clinton,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 296–299.
  29. “Reflections on Trump’s Celebrity Politics and Psychobiography,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 277–285.
  30. “Reappraising the First President Bush,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 22, no. 4, (March 2016): 329–331.
  31. “Historian, Psychohistorian: D.J Fisher,” Clio’s Psyche Vol 22, No. 3 (December 2015):168–180.
  32. “Visionaries for Peace,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 21, No. 4 (March 2015): 476–479.
  33. “Baseball’s Love Affair with Derek Jeter,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2014): 334–339.
  34. “Feminist Historian Joan Wallach Scott,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 178–186.
  35. “Perspectives on Terrorism on the High Seas,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 2 (September 2014): 222–226.
  36. “Henry Lawton: Psychohistorian and Social Worker,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2014): 68–73.
  37. “Featured Psychological Diplomat: Joseph V. Montville,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 329–341.
  38. “Psychohistorians Lifton, deMause, and Volkan,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 341–350.
  39. “Arnold Richards: Disseminating Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 3 (December 2013): 265–270.
  40. “Friedman’s Psychobiographical Comparison of Fromm and Erikson,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 20, No. 1 (June 2013): 86–96.
  41. “The Reduction of Violence in an Era of Apocalyptic Danger,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 311–314.
  42. “A Psychobiographer’s Ruminations on Ayn Rand,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 332–334.
  43. “The Historian’s Life of Joseph Dowling,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 355–356.
  44. “The Psychiatrist/Psychoanalyst as Psychohistorian: Sander Breiner,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 3 (December 2012): 359–360.
  45. “Romney: Identifying with and Pursuing His Father’s Dreams,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 2 (September 2012): 127–133.
  46. “Betty Glad: In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 19, No. 2 (September 2012): 240–241 (with Nicole Alliegro).
  47. “Election 2012 Free Associations and Psychohistorical Questions” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4 (March 2012): 463–73.
  48. “Remembering Andrew Brink’s Search for Knowledge” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4 (March 2012):  479–82.
  49. “The Psychoanalytic Life of Elisabeth Young-Bruehl” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 4 March 2012:  490–91.
  50. “The Life and Art of Friendship of Rudolph Binion,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 2 (September 2011): 200–209.
  51. “The Life of Victor Wolfenstein,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 2 (September 2011): 238–242 (with Bob Lentz).
  52. “Daniel Rancour-Laferriere: Psychoanalytic Scholar of Russia and Religion,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 18, No. 1 (June 2011): 91–102.
  53. “Editorial Board Member and Psychologist Leon Rappoport,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 3 (December 2010): 264–266 (with Ronald Downy [Kansas State University]).
  54. “L. Pierce Clark: An Early Psychobiographer,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 9–16 (with Elizabeth Wirth Marvick [UCLA]).
  55. “America’s First Psychobiographer: Preserved Smith and His Insights on Luther,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 22–27 (with Elizabeth Wirth Marvick [UCLA])
  56. “The Psychological Contributions and Lives of Henry Lawton and J. Lee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 17–21.
  57. “Freud’s Theories Reflected His Needs,” Vol. 17, No. 1 (June/September 2010): 98–99.
  58. “Ralph Colp’s Creative Identification with Charles Darwin,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 4 (March 2010): 360–365.
  59. “A Psychohistorical Exchange on Barack Obama’s Family Background,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 3 (December 2009): ): 247–257 (with Ken Fuchsman –University of Connecticut]).
  60. “Nancy Kobrin’s Journey from Psychoanalysis to Fighting Terrorism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 16, No. 2 (September 2009): 169–182.
  61. “The Life Experience and Scholarly Achievement of J. Lee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 4 (March 2009): pp. 224–30.
  62. “Grief and Loss in the Bush Family,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 115–118.
  63. “Thinking and Laughing About Biden and Palin,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 164–168.
  64. “Ralph Colp: Darwin Scholar and Psychiatrist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 3 (December 2008): 105, 160–162.
  65. “A Brilliant and Playful Listener to the Unconscious,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 57–60. [on Montague Ullman]
  66. “Montague Ullman (1916–2008): Dream Research Pioneer,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 51–57. (with Judith Gardiner)
  67. “Obama’s Dreams from and of His Father,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 2 (September 2008): 70–77.
  68. “Child Abuse and Baseball: Torre and Steinbrenner,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 1 (June 2008): 19–23.
  69. “Fred I. Greenstein: Princeton Political Psychologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 15, No. 1 (June 2008): 1, 33–38.
  70. “George E. Vaillant: Featured Scholar on Aging Well,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 4 (March 2008): 133–39.
  71. “In Memoriam: Ben Brody (1920–2007),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007): 101–102.
  72. “Giuliani as His Father’s Son,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 3 (December 2007): 73–84.
  73. “In Memoriam: Isaac Zieman, Survivor and Peacemaker,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 1–2 (September /June 2007 Joint issue): 33–36 (with Eva Fogelman).
  74. “Thomas Jefferson without Idealization,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 14, No. 1–2 (September /June 2007 Joint issue): 1, 20–24.
  75. “C. Fred Alford: Professor of Government and Distinguished Scholar-Teacher,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 179, 204–210.
  76. “In Memoriam: Connalee Shneidman,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 4 (March 2007): 224–226. With Peter Schwab of SUNY—Purchase.
  77. “Victor Wolfenstein: Psychoanalytic-Marxist Scholar,” Clio’s Psyche 13, No. 3 (December 2006): 165–174 (with Bob Lentz).
  78. “John Forrester: A Cambridge Historian of Psychoanalysis,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 2 (September 2006): 81, 87–94.
  79. “Arnold A. Rogow: In Memoriam,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 2 (September 2006): 102–103 (with Jeanne Rogow).
  80. “Donald Carveth: Psychoanalytic Sociologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 1 (June 2006): 66–74.
  81. “Art and Science in Psychohistory,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 13, No. 1 (June 2006): 11–13.
  82. “The Making of Darwin’s Marital Happiness,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 4 (March 2006): 183–187.
  83. “Elisabeth Young-Bruehl and the Vita Psychoanalytica,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 3 (December 2005): 113, 139–149 (Judith Harris [George Washington University] was the lead author of this Feature Scholar Interview).
  84. “Thomas A. Kohut: Historian with a Psychoanalytic World View,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 37, 49–56.
  85. “In Memoriam: John E. Mack (1929–2004),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No. 2 (September 2005): 108–110.
  86. “Sue Erikson Bloland: A Conversation on Fame,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 12, No.1 (June 2005): 1, 10–16.
  87. “Nancy J. Chodorow: Psychoanalyst and Gender Theorist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 4 (March 2005): 113, 134–143 (with Bob Lentz—Clio’s Psyche).
  88. “Geoffrey Cocks: Historian of Film and Nazi Germany” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 35, 56- 70.
  89. “A Dialogue on Applying DSM-IV Categories to Learn Psychohistory: Lenin as Exemplar,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 2 (September 2004): 40–46 (with Anna Geifman [Boston University]).
  90. “Philip Pomper: a Psychohistorical Scholar of Russia” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 1 (June 2004): 1, 13–20.
  91. “In Memoriam: Rita Ransohoff (1916–2003)” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 11, No. 1 (June 2004): 27–29 (with Joan Wynn [University of Chicago]).
  92. “Carol Gilligan: The Voice of a Woman Psychohistorian” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (March 2004): 121–131.
  93. “Lawrence J. Friedman: Psychohistorian,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2003): 75, 101–108.
  94. “Reflections on the Psychohistory and Economics of American m,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2003): 99–101.
  95. “J. Lee Shneidman: Historian” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 10, No. 1 (June 2003): 26–30.
  96. “Henry W. Lawton: Independent Scholar and Psychohistorian of Repressed Violence” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 4 (March 2003): 157, 189–199.
  97. “In Memoriam: Lewis Feuer (1912–2002): Psychoanalytic Philosopher and Sociologist,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 4 (March 2003): 206–210.
  98. “Psychohistorian of the Islamic Near East: Norman Itzkowitz” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 3 (December 2002): 146–150.
  99. “A Biographer and His Subject: Ralph Colp and Charles Darwin” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 2 (September 2002): 146–150.
  100. “Elizabeth Wirth Marvick: Half a Century of Researching Childhood” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 1, 26–36 (with Bob Lentz).
  101. “In Memoriam: Melvin Kalfus (1931–2002)” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 9, No. 1 (June 2002): 48–51.
  102. “A Conversation with Charles B. Strozier on Heinz Kohut,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 2 (September 2001): 49, 85–90. A Featured Scholar Interview co-authored with Bob Lentz.
  103. “Eli Sagan: Scholar of Aggression and Sociologist” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2001): 31–38.
  104. “An Intellectual Partnership: Jay Gonen and Mary Coleman” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 4 (March 2001): 167,189–198.
  105. “Psychoanalysis and History: Andrea Sabbadini” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 4 (March 2001): 212–214.
  106. “A Literary Psychohistorian: Dan Dervin,” Clio’s Psyche 7, No. 2 (September 2000): 85–88. A Featured Scholar Interview.
  107. “In Memoriam: George Kren (1926–2000),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 2 (June 2000): 95, 98.
  108. “Mel Kalfus: Psychobiographer, Institution Builder, and Survivor” (Featured Scholar Interview) Clio’s Psyche Vol. 7, No. 1 (June 2000): 32–41.
  109. “An Israeli Psychohistorian: Avner Falk” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 3 (December 1999): 122–126.
  110. “The Creativity of Andrew Brink” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 2 (September 1999):75–81.
  111. “Political Psychologist and Presidential Scholar Betty Glad” (Featured Scholar Interview) Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999):18–25 (with Bob Lentz).
  112. “A Conversation on Political Personality: Gore, Botha, De Klerk and Mandela,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999):25–30 (with Aubrey Immelman).
  113. “In Memoriam: William J. Gilmore (1945–1999),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 6, No. 1 (September 1999): 39–40.
  114. “Clinton’s ‘Blind Spots’ and the ‘Rorschach Presidency,’” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 3 (March 1998): 69–76.
  115. “Conclusion” [To the Special Issue, “Freud and Asimov: Two Very Different “Psychohistories.”] Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 36–37.
  116. “In Search of Isaac Asimov,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 5, No. 1 (June 1998): 30–36.
  117. “Hitler’s Self-Defeatism,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 3 (December 1997): 78–81.
  118. “The Psychoanalytically-Informed Historian: Peter Gay” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 2 (September 1997): 33, 62–66 (with David Felix and Bob Lentz)
  119. “In Memoriam: Melvin Goldstein (1926–1997),” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 30–31.
  120. “Reflections on Isaac Asimov,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 12–13.
  121. “Sir Humphry Davy’s Belief in Heavenly Extraterrestrials,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 4, No. 1 (June 1997): 7–9.
  122. “My Motivation: Patterns and Secrets of an Immigrant Family,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 104–108.
  123. “A Conversation with Charles B. Strozier” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1997): 97, 119–125.
  124. “George Steinbrenner and the Yankees: Personality and Sports Psychology,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 56–58.
  125. “The Cry of a Child: The Unabomber Suspect’s Explosive Family Boundaries,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 2 (September 1996): 33–36 (co-authored with Michele O’Donnell, a Ramapo student who went on to graduate school).
  126. “Meet the Editors,” Clio’s Psyche Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 1996): 1–5.
  127. “The Advocacy and Detachment of Robert Jay Lifton” (Featured Scholar Interview), Clio’s Psyche Vol. 2, No. 3 (December 1995): 45, 56–62.

REGISTRATION AND FEES:

Tuition: $450/10-week course/trimester (can be paid in 2 installments)
Registration fee: $25/course (waived for ORI’s candidates in training)

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS are available for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for retired or disabled practitioners, or need-based or/and those who live outside of the USA.
To apply for your scholarship, please go to the registration form below.

CANCELLATION POLICY:
Full refund until the 1st session.
75% refund before the 2nd session.
50% refund before the 3rd session.
No refund from the day of the third session, but 50% of the full paid tuition will be applied to any further ORI events.

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